Momento Mori

Posted: October 11, 2011 in Medical, Morgue, Theology, Unusual Findings, Weird
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Today’s find is more historical interest, I don’t find this macabre I find it very poignant.

The invention of photography might well be something we take for granted, after all we can happily wander around with digital cameras, phone camera’s and video cameras, we can snap anything we fancy, we can have a reel of 400 digital images to delete and never think about it…

But I think we should, imagine the age before photography where sketches, memories and sculptures caught the vision of the long deceased? Wouldn’t they marvel at even one small snap we produce?

From 1839 the invention of the daguerreotype was the first commercially successful photography, this meant pictures of the family could be taken however for the most part this was used as a momento for children. It’s worth noting here that the child mortality rate was high and often this would be the only pictorial reference.

http://www.coffinworks.org/I also found this if you are in England, may have to try to take a trip!

Of course it wasn’t restricted to children, originally they pictures might only be portrait shots but later on this adapted to other things, such as the coffin, or perhaps even props. For the children this might be a photo of the babe in the cot with toys, as time went on there was more thought put into the rosy cheeks or other little details.

This was a more popular trend in Europe than it was in the United States. I don’t know why because it’s America that has a Coffin Museum…
Postmortem man

Advertisements
Comments
  1. Artery says:

    I think the high infant mortality rate and the novelty of photography were the reasons for this trend. Seems very morbid to us but then death was a far more common occurrence then.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s