Okay it’s not ghosts or supernatural but sometimes human beings love to leave us things we could use for our own imagination. Driving along roads at night can be lonely enough however there is also a great sense of imagination when you pass a half completed road or perhaps even half over-grown ones.

For instances in Portland, Oregan there is a section of unused ramp at the western terminus. How about heading on to Interstate 189 in Burlington Vermont, there are now lanes blacked by discarded electronics.

Older areas might well have been left behind when an amendment to a highway/road has occurred and it’s not longer needed.  A good example of this appears to be the Pennsylvania Turnpike where two-lane tunnels and four-lane approaches were bypassed. The old tunnels and roadways on this one were reused as a multi-use trail. There are also some where the road might have been a ramp up to a bridge that was demolished.

Sometimes it’s due to the road never being finished, perhaps they started and ran out of cash or someone managed to put a stop to it. In London (England) the M11 motorway has two unused slips at Junction 4 (Charlie Brown’s) which would have gone into the link for the M12 motorway going to Essex.

The A47 in Rutland, near Wardley has an unused stretch of carriageway that now only sees use as access to a transmitting station. The A2 in Kent ended up with part of the road being made into a public park then it was realigned back in 2009.

1000 Islands Parkway in Eastern Ontario, this is another interesting one as it has two Ghost Lanes down it’s 40km length, these lanes are now used pretty much as a pedestrian or cycle lane on a scenic area. Originally it was going to be an alternate route to the main inland highway and be a sort of divided highway. The plans were put in motion and began sometime in the 1930’s where the unnamed route was began, when the wartime shortages affected it part of the road was left as gravel and finished in 1945 when the war ended. Highway 25 was then added to the 1948 Ontario Maps. In 1952 the entire thing was then redesigned on another route by December 1952 as Highway 401 and the route was no longer in use.

The Highway was due to become part of the freeway route but public outcry would be huge and so in the early 1960’s the plans were abandoned and the restoration on the river road but it’s fully decommissioned status as a road was eventually logged September 8th 1970, King’s Highway was to be no more.  Whilst I have really skipped over many facts that could have been put up here really I just liked the story of the scenic parkway that sits there now.

So perhaps if you are out travelling and spot somewhere as a road to nowhere you might like to hit me with a reply about them.

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