Japanese folklore gives us the name Kasha, a demon or strange cannibalistic entity that feeds on human corpses. It is said to bring the bodies to hell of those that committed mortal sins in life. 8th Avenue and Harding in Honolulu, Hawaii is said to contain a Kasha. It is said that it took up residency after a family was murdered by the father, the bodies of his wife and son were found but there was no sign of his daughter around.

In 1942 a woman called the authorities saying she had an unseen entity that had attacked her children. Police apparently watched in horror as the children were thrown across the room.

Later on three women moved in, one had the entity touch her and the frightened ladies called the police. The women wanted out! And so asked the police man to follow them down the drive, for some reason they turned off to a parking lot and the officer found them grappling with the unseen force. When he tried to help he too was forced back.  The one woman was choking and he got them out, none of their cars would start either. When the woman finally got back to the car and the policeman to his, it seemed it was okay and they started up again.

The troubles then continued, and gained momentum, the car door was ripped off and tossed to the roadside then the woman who was choking was thrown from the moving car. The three witnesses could do nothing as she was strangled to death.

In 1977 it seems that the incident was finally brought to a halt by a young couple who moved in, the woman awoke in the night to find a large woman with no arms or legs hovering above her. They consulted with their reverend, he suggested that they offer food to the intruder for a week and that it should help it to find where it belonged, it seems that it stopped the activity and no I really don’t understand the food thing before you ask.

 

Kasha1

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Comments
  1. psudowolf says:

    Well, I wouldn’t know about the far eastern traditions, but in western lore, I recall that food offerings, milk, honey, and bread especially, have been very traditional methods of placating supernatural entities. A way of offering gratitude, hospitality, and generosity, I would guess that the reverend was working within this tradition when he suggested a food sacrifice.
    Just a possible explanation I thought I’d throw in.

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