It’s a fairly small area in Kent, England that comes with the title of Most Haunted Village in Britain and has at the least, twelve documented cases of hauntings. There are numerous reports, a history of tragic deaths and a speculation that the high magnetism that occurs in the ground naturally would be a contributing factor to the events.

The Pluckley brickworks are said to be haunted by a screaming man, who died when he was smothered by drying clay that fell on him. So spare a thought for Taylor Jay Smith.

A gypsy named Abigail Nicolas is said to haunt a crossroads bridge, where she used to sell watermelons. She set herself on fire by accident when a pipe spark set her alight and was fuelled by the whiskey she had been been drinking.

When visiting St Nicholas’ Church keep an eye out for the red or white lady, both are Dering family members that are buried in one of the seven lead lined coffins, lying within oak coffins. In the crypt the red lady was buried with a red rose and is searching for her new born son.

A conflict with the tales about the lead and oak coffins gives a similar tale about Kiralee the Dering White Lady, her husband (the Baron) was so distraught by her death that to prevent decay he had her buried in a lead and then oak coffin. Quite why this would lead to a haunting I cannot say but there might be more to the story that I couldn’t find, or again various tales have crossed over.

Still with me? Phew! So as well as this we have Robert Dubois who was a highwayman, he operated just outside at Stuart. He would hide behind a tree, known as Fright Corner, where he would then jump out and stun the victim. It was however a little too predictable after a while and a guard killed him, with a spear that pinned him to the tree. The tree has since disappeared from the location but it is said that Dubois and the tree appear, he then jumps out from behind it. It’s worth noting that I really gave this tale little regard myself as it was handed to us via the notoriously hammy Most Haunted.

Apparently a horse and carriage can be seen or heard going through the village at high speed on Maltmon’s Hill, there is no reason given for it. A monk haunts Greystones and may have been involved with the Lady of Rose court, but again I couldn’t see why this sparked a haunting, there must be more to the story than them simply appearing.

The story of the Colonel has a little more basis though and it is quite sad, the unnamed man travelled to Park Wood near the Village, he committed suicide by hanging himself. He is said to walk about there now, in his military regalia, hence his nickname. He seems quite harmless and often people are not aware at the time that he is a ghost and seem quite surprised to find this out later on.

The Pinnocks house has a windmill nearby and is allegedly haunted by Richard ‘Dicky’ Bus. The mill was closed down in 1930 and was destroyed by lightning. He usually turns up before a storm as a black silhouette. Perhaps he is trying to warn people of the storm?

The lady of Rose Court haunts the house Rose Court and may have been involved with the monk mentioned above as part of some love triangle. She committed suicide by ingesting poisonous berries and between 4-5pm can be heard calling her dogs.

Henry Tuff was once the headmaster of Smarden School, he was friends with Dicky and would visit him Sundays so that they could discuss politics. He went missing one day and was found on the land leading up to the mills were he had hung himself in a tree. His ghost is said to roam that area.

And lastly, yes I swear this is the end now, how about a visit into Pluckley Woods? Dering Woods is apparently also known as the screaming woods, because at night it is said that you can hear the screams of numerous people that got lost and died there.

So if you fancy a trip out do let me know if you experience anything or have in the past.

Paranormal Database Entries.

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