In 1974 the Joelma building in São Paulo, Brazil caught fire and took a tragic 189 lives along with it. The legend seems to have gone on for a long time before the final days of the building, a 400 year legacy surrounds the land and a legend of 13 cursed souls of Jesuit colonists starts it, but 13 saints arriving later on seems to have ended it.

In 1554 the founding of São Paulo was started with Vasco da Gama and his Portuguese invaders, 12 priests and their altar boy founded the Jesuit College and they were cursed by the local tribe. They were cursed to take the lives of their fellow Christians who dared to live on the land.

On the area was a house for a chemist, Paul Campbell, he lived with his own family and extended family. He was a respected chemist and one day he returned home with a gun in hand, killing the household before burying them in a pit in the back of the garden and then turned the gun on himself. Murder-suicide, and 12 dead and the curse of the thirteen claimed a fire-fighter who caught an infection from one of the corpses and died the next day.

For 25 years that property and it’s land remained vacant until the construction of the Joelma building. The address name was changed, but still witnesses spoke about odd disturbances in the building. Even in 1972 it seemed that no one was at rest.

In 1974 an electrical fire engulfed the building, it killed 189 people and hospitalised 343. Strangely there were 13 victims that no one could identify or witness as being in the building prior to it’s outbreak. The thirteen people were in an elevator that would have reached up to 700 degrees at the time, yes that is roasting people level, and yet strangely all 13 of them emerged as a group. They did however died once outside from smoke inhalation, strangely thought it seems that the number 13 came around enough times to keep the original story in the recollection.

joelma-fire-late-on

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