Archive for April, 2017

(Sydney, Australia) As people arrived to colonise Australia it was important to minimise the disease, smallpox, plague etc.. reaching the island. A quarantine facility was implemented and an act passed in 1832 meant the quarantine station was there to protect the people for over 100 years. 1828-1984 the station was open in some way or another.

At peak times people would run out of space, camps would be made outside for residents. It could be a miserable experience and healthy people would help with cleaning and constructions just to break the monotony.

Lady McNaughton was a typhoid riddled ship which came with 54 dead in 1837. A further 13 died in the station. Captain Stokes of the Beagle also wrote that it was possible to identify the station by the White Crosses littered around it.

It is still like a city in itself and there are regular tourists, and not surprisingly there are ghost tours in operation.

There are stories of doctors, nurses and disembodied patients that return to haunt the place. There are three cemeteries that now are overgrown or demolished and no doubt some of those buried suffered as they passed from awful sicknesses too. Cold spots and feelings of being touched are reports that have come back.

Park rangers have historically reported ghostly lights or figures in unoccupied hallways and rooms of the building, they have then gone into to investigate only to find that there is no-one there. A common tale from visitors is about a little girl who sometimes holds a tourists hand, or people can join the group, only to later realise that no child was in the tour group.

Another story from the Australian Ghost Hunters Society was that a woman on the tour went to the mortuary with the group. She looked pale and concerned at the end of the tour and when asked why she said she had seen a body on the slab. It was not a prank, she said only she had seemed to see it, and he turned to her. He said “Look what they’ve done to me! Look what they’ve done to me!” he then exposed an incision from his throat to his naval. It was an experience she would never forget.

Q Station+whales

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Little Pascuala (or La Pascualita) has been doing the rounds on my internet feed for a while now, so I figured she’d be worth a post. She’s a mannequin in a shop window, drawing people in to see the bridal shop because of a bizarre story circulating around her.

The mannequin has an attached urban legend because of her life-like appearance, some are convinced that she is a corpse and was embalmed then used as a model for the wedding dresses on sale there.

On the 25th March 1930 she was unveiled in a spring season gown, instantly the attention came to the very life-like looking mannequin with her wide-eyed glass orbs and richly detailed skin and features. The mannequin looked very much like the owner at that time, Pascuala Esparza, and people concluded that it could in fact be her embalmed body. The daughter had recently died the day after her wedding as she had been bitten by a black widow spider.

La Popular, Chihuahua, Mexico, met with the disapproval of the locals because of this idea. By the time Pascuala himself had issued a formal statement against the growing rumours it wasn’t helpful, the rumours were abound and it seemed quite a great deal of people were unwilling to believe the mother. Over time her daughters name was sadly lost in the recounting of the tales, La Pascualita is now the living memory of that newly wed.

The mannequin comes attached to some supernatural happenings, none are confirmed. If she truly is an embalmed woman it might be worth a consideration but the one I found fantastical was the idea of the love-sick French Magician who would come to her at night, magically revive her and take her out in the town. More believable experiences are those of feeling she is watching someone, or her eyes feel like they follow you. I get that with good wax-work models. Another says she shifts positions over night.

The staff are asked to change her behind closed doors and many have said that they feel uncomfortable about it, she even has varicose veins on her legs. Another account I spotted from an employee also said that only the hand and head were that details and that is why there are never revealing dresses on her.

Some people have considered the ‘corpse’ worth of a sainthood due to her condition, some brides use the dress she is wearing that day to be the choice for them as a symbol of good luck, quite why I cannot see if the daughters wedding and day after were so disastrous she died…

I am inclined to believe the Museum of Hoaxes in considering this one, it would take a considerable effort to keep a body in that condition especially if you are to consider she is regularly moved and handled. Corpses are meant to deteriorate, embalming and mummification will preserve them to a great degree but as the environment changes nature quickly takes over the intended role of breaking the remains down.

Lenin’s perfectly well tended body is cared for and only displayed not touched, to remain so well preserved. The mannequin is moved to change, handled to be dressed and therefore it is my opinion that whilst she is an expensive and good addition to the shop, she is not a corpse. My verdict is an urban legend.

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It’s no secret that England is considered an old historical place and has a fair share of ghost stories, from headless horsemen to the ghosts of animals on the moors and Sussex, England may be subject to a road with an interesting haunting but also a potentially dangerous one. (Starting source BBC Website)

In November 1992, a unsuspecting Ian Sharpe was driving along the road from Sussex to Kent. A girl in white, with what he described as “beautiful eyes”, stepped in front of his car without warning and she disappeared under the front wheels. Shocked and distraught he stopped the car, he was sure he had killed her or at the very least caused her some serious injury. He got out and made a search to find no body, human or animal and not even a sign of impact, other than the frantic beating of his heart.

Two weeks later another report of a man experiencing a similar event came in, again he rushed out expecting a tragedy to find zero evidence of the event.

There is another nearby road where another unexplained happening has been reported, this time a little less worrying as people are not slamming on their brakes but there is a phantom hitch-hiker near the Lower Bell public house on the same road, the mysterious entity spends a ride towards Maidstone putting the worlds to right with their drive before vanishing right out of the seat.

So what is the speculation behind this? Some believe that it is of a woman called Judith Langham who was knocked down in 1965, she was wearing her white bridal gown on the way to her wedding, Has the poor victim now become a white lady?

There is another report earlier than that of 1992 with Ian Sharpe too, in 1974 a man named Maurice Goodenaugh came to the local police to say that he had left a blanket on a woman he had hit and had begged for help. When he came back with the police there was no sign of the seriously hurt woman and again nothing to suggest what had happened to her if she had been there in the first place.

After this there are two other people that stepped forward to report it, this was listed in the tabloid “The Sun” and Joseph Chester and Tracy Boon said they had seen a woman wearing a nightgown on the road, in 1968 and in 1999. They also report a man called Bob Vandeeper gave a woman a lift in 1962 but this is before the crash and so could not be the bride surely?

So is this all correct? Well it seems not, there is more information about this, Judith Langham was not the bride but there was a bride that died. 19th November 1965, a Friday and the eve of her wedding, at Blue Bell Hill. A Jaguar, driven by Harry Backhouse, collided with a Ford Cortina and killed three of the four woman, one of which was 22-year-old Susan Browne, who was due to marry RAF technician Brian Wettton, she died five days after the accident in the hospital. There were two other women, Judith Lingham and Patricia Ferguson, and Patricia died at the site, but Judith died later on, which is probably where the initial rumour about the bride began.

So is this road haunted or is it just that there’s a tragedy there and unusual events have transposed themselves around to fit it? Or is there really the ghost of a young woman killed at the scene, bride or not? And if so who was the other mystery person in 1962?

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