Archive for the ‘Demons’ Category

I love Asian based horror stories as much as any story, they are wonderfully ingenious and make fantastic horror films, though I cannot say I always like the Western remakes as they sometimes miss the reason they were scary as they budget up and add in CGI none the less….

There’s a tale that a young woman who fell on to a railway line was cut in two by an oncoming train, becoming a vengeful spirit she is armed with a scythe and travels on her hands or elbows, she makes the strange tek-tek noise and anyone too slow that encounters her at night is cut in half, mimicking her own fate.

The legend says s school boy walking home saw a beautiful girl resting herself against a windowsill, he was wondering what she was doing at the all-boys group but he couldn’t ask. She leapt at him and he saw her lower-half was missing. Now before he could run he was cut in half.

Another version of the urban legend gives the name to her, Kashima Reiko, who haunts bathroom stalls and asks occupants where her legs are. To save yourself in such an incident you tell her they are at the Meishin Railway and you answer Kashima Reiko if she asks you who told you this. The ghost sometimes just asks your for her name, if you then use Kashima Reiko she will attack you. You must use Kamen Shinin Ma – Mask Death Demon – and now once you have heard this story she is said to appear one month later (incidentally I read and wrote these notes longer ago than that if you’re concerned).

Another lovely urban legend, it has been used for a horror film Teke-Teke. The story has also been used in some manga tales, including the first anime episode of Ghost Stories.

Teketeke.png
By Dr.LantisOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

 

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I thought I would pick some folklore/stories from the Caribbean for this blog. To be fair I believe most of the good stuff would be local legend and I’ve not ben lucky enough to get to that side of the world so armchair investigations will be my guide for this… feel free to correct anything I get wrong as always.

The first one is Papa Bois who is pretty much thought of as the keeper of the forest, a protector of them and the enclosed flora and fauna. She is said to be married to the Mama Dlo, a water entity. His appearance is thought to be a short, old man of African descent and he has cloven hooves, or possibly in some notations his left leg ends in a large hoof. He has a beard of leaves and despite his age is very strong and can run faster than a deer.

Papa Bois’ body is completely covered with hair like that of a donkey, he has small horns that sprout from his forehead and is know to carry out a hollowed-out bulls’ horn so he can use that to warn animals when hunters approach. He is said to have the power of metamorphoses and most often uses this to transform into a deer, he then lures hunters deeper into the forest to get them lost. This is much like his wife, Mama Dlo, who does the same to sailors.

Should you meet Papa Bois you must be polite and refrain from staring at his hooves. Say something nice like “good day old father” an ensure that you don’t do anything to upset him. He is also found in Grenadian folklore and represented as a huge Opossum. Hunters of the forest are afraid of him because of the tricks he uses.

My second choice is La Diablesse, a female devil, who was born as a human but her malicious shape-shifting spirit was born of her dealings with the devil. She can appear very beautiful but her hideous face is hidden by a large brimmed hat, and she wears long dresses to hide the fact that one leg ends with a hoof, she often walks with her human foot on the road and her hooved road in the grass at the roadside. She can cast spells on unsuspecting male victims, then leads them into the forest with promises of sexual acts but then she will disappear leaving him lost and confused. In a panic the victim runs around the forest until he meets his death by falling down a ravine or drowning in a river.

My third choice was Lagahoo, this folklore comes from Trinidad and Tobago (usually considered part of the Caribbean) and is the equivalent in cousin to the French loup-garou and or German werewolf, though not restricted to the form of a wolf. It is a normal human during the day with no head and at night roams around with a wooden coffin on its neck. On the coffin there are three lighted candles, the long loose end of a heavy iron chain is noosed around the waist and trails behind. Often it can be seen with chains around its neck which change in side and at times with one of the appendages turned backwards.

Legahoo can change into various animals too, like horses, pigs or goats and on occasion is even a centaur. It is thought to be a blood sucker, which is less particular than vampires about its food source as it will feed from animals like cows and goats. To kill a Legahoo you need to beat it with a stick that has been anointed with holy water and holy oil for nine days. When you beat the creature it will change into others, then waves of water until finally it disappears in a mist.

My final choice is that of the Soucouyant, it is also known as the Ole-Higue or Loogaroo and is a blood sucking hag. She appears as a reclusive old woman in the day and then at night she strips off her wrinkled skin and puts it in a mortar. In her true form, a fireball, she flies across the dark skies in search of a victim. She can enter the home of a victim through small holes like cracks, crevices and keyholes.

The Soucouyant takes the blood from arms, legs and soft parts whilst the victim is sleeping and leaves blue-black marks that are seen in the morning. If they draw too much blood then the victim will either die or become one themselves. The creature also practices witchcraft, voodoo and black magic. They trade their victim’s souls for evil powers with the Bazil, the demon who resides in the silk cotton tree.

If you want to expose one you need to heap rice around the house or at the village crossroads, as the creature will be obliged to gather every grain and can be caught in the act as she tries to do so. To destroy her, coarse salt must be placed in the mortar that has her skin so she perishes because she cannot put it back on. The skin of the Soucouyant is very valuable as it us used in the practice of black magic.

She is part of a class of spirits called jumbies, and some say that they may well have been brought over by the European countries and so the French vampire-myths intermingled with those of enslaved Africans.

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Two main legends surround the famous Hun when it comes to the Venetian Lagoon and it’s islands.

Attila’s throne is still there to be admired on Torcello island, between the two churches of Santa Maria Assunta and Santa Fosca. There is a big marble chair on the grass, allegedly it belonged to the mighty leader and he is said to return back there on the odd occasion.

North of Torcello is a little island called Monte Dell’Oro (Mount of Gold). The Huns would move their hauls through the island and one that was laden with gold sank. Paoletti reported that Attilla destroyed Altino and they put the treasures there, they kept the treasures sank in the mud in tanks. The area was then inhabited by refugees who put a Monastery and church there. In the late Middle Ages the area was used to build simple military posts and then in 1848 insurgents built a stronger building, that was used by the Italian Army in the First World War. There is a small remnant of this but other buildings there have long seen been left to decay and no trace remains of them. Until 1994 the island was State owned but is not privately owned and can only be reached there by private boat. 

Attila’s treasure that was gathered via death and destruction is now said to be guarded there by the devil himself. The devil, disguised as a black cat, can be seen on the island if you try to go after the gold. 

 

Japanese folklore gives us the name Kasha, a demon or strange cannibalistic entity that feeds on human corpses. It is said to bring the bodies to hell of those that committed mortal sins in life. 8th Avenue and Harding in Honolulu, Hawaii is said to contain a Kasha. It is said that it took up residency after a family was murdered by the father, the bodies of his wife and son were found but there was no sign of his daughter around.

In 1942 a woman called the authorities saying she had an unseen entity that had attacked her children. Police apparently watched in horror as the children were thrown across the room.

Later on three women moved in, one had the entity touch her and the frightened ladies called the police. The women wanted out! And so asked the police man to follow them down the drive, for some reason they turned off to a parking lot and the officer found them grappling with the unseen force. When he tried to help he too was forced back.  The one woman was choking and he got them out, none of their cars would start either. When the woman finally got back to the car and the policeman to his, it seemed it was okay and they started up again.

The troubles then continued, and gained momentum, the car door was ripped off and tossed to the roadside then the woman who was choking was thrown from the moving car. The three witnesses could do nothing as she was strangled to death.

In 1977 it seems that the incident was finally brought to a halt by a young couple who moved in, the woman awoke in the night to find a large woman with no arms or legs hovering above her. They consulted with their reverend, he suggested that they offer food to the intruder for a week and that it should help it to find where it belonged, it seems that it stopped the activity and no I really don’t understand the food thing before you ask.

 

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Japanese immigrants brought the legend with them to Hawaii, the legend is of the faceless creature. In Japan a famous Mujina was Kozo, he took the form of a monk and would travel the roads at night, he would ask passers by for tea or water.

In 1959 at a drive-through in Kahala, Hawaii, a woman was reported to have come into contact with one of these creatures. The local woman went to the restroom and noticed a red-headed lady brushing her hair. She got close enough to see the woman had no facial features, she had to be treated at the hospital for a nervous breakdown over the event.

A local radio show host, Glen Grant, picked up the story and gave it to his listeners in 1981. The woman involved called up to recount the tale and told him the previously unreported detail about the red hair, since then it seems other witnesses have come forward about the Mujina.

A story about the Mujina here.

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