Archive for the ‘Vampires’ Category

Bram Stoker is famous for his novel Dracula, the named linked in modern times to Vlad Tepes, the son of the dragon and quite a few associations between the seaside town of Whitby, England are reflected in his book.

Fanny Harker was for many years the landlady to Stoker and used the family name in honour of that friendship. Stoker was married with one child, Noel, whilst on holiday with his family a local tragedy seemed to have inspired a well-known part of his book (if not a great deal). Chapter 7 is where the Russian ship the Demeter rolls in, unmanned bar a dead man’s hand which seems to have originated from an incident when local small fishing vessels (known as Cobles) were doing their usual business.

One was off the towns harbour when from the mists a large ship came out in front. Frantic cries from the fishermen went unheard and the ship carried on towards the coble. It upturned the small vessel as it hurt and drown two of the crew in the process, it then carried on sailing and disappeared into the mist.

The “great storm” mentioned did occur, many bad storms had hit the coast over the years but it is generally accepted that Stoker meant the one from 1861.

Much of the descriptions he gives for Whitby are still pretty accurate for today, visitors can follow historical trails for both Bram Stoker and Dracula inspired looks at the town. Whitby has many local landmarks and good views, including ones over the harbour where you can still see fishing vessels and crew at sea.

 

As unsolved cases go this is one that carries on being cited when I am doing my usual creepy tales and oddities searches. Lily Lindeström was found dead on May 4th, 1932, she was 32 years of age when she died. The Atlas Vampire is the nickname of her unidentified assailant.

Lily was a prostitute who was found murdered in her small apartment in the Sank Eriksplan, Atlas area of Stockholm, Sweden. She was known to have entertained her clients in her home which was a fairly small and dank little abode, and would have been referred to as a “call girl” as her apartment contained a phone from which she would also have been able to arrange her meets. She had been dead for a couple of days, her skull had been crushed and the detectives noticed someone had been drinking her blood.

She had last been seen by her friend Minnie Jansson (35 years old), she’d borrowed condoms twice in one night from Minnie.  Minnie was also another sex worker. The last of the two times Lily was naked under her coat and was not seen again for a couple of days. Her friend decided that it was time to go to see her and tried the doorbell but got no reply, this is when she raised the alarm.

The police forced themselves in to find her corpse on the sofa with her clothes folded up on the chair nearby. Her skull had been dealt repeated crushing blows but more gruesome than that were the signs that someone had been drinking her blood! There were traces of saliva on her neck and body, and so they feared the blood had been drank due to this and the fact they found a blood stained gravy ladle. She had been dead for between two or three days and they were able to retrieve the evidence of sexual activity before her death, they retrieved a used condom from her anus during their investigations. 

There has never been anyone brought to justice for her strange murder. The police interviewed her known clients, and it does seem quite likely that the last client she saw was also her killer. This case was before the days of DNA and so might well have been something modern forensics would have addressed but they could not, so the question of who owned the saliva and where all the blood went continues to remain unanswered.

As with many things in today’s media Lily has not escaped the trappings of being used as a creepypasta. It’s certainly not the worst thing I have ever read, and in fact with grammatical errors aside for a short story it reads pretty well. Though it’s up to you if you think it’s worth a read… the links there if you want it.

Vampirmordet 1932 Polismuseet

Dalkeith, Lothian, Scotland has been given mention in vampiric tales thanks to a murder trial that left James Spalding going to the gallows in 1638, convicted of murder. The story goes that he prayed he would not die until he had found a way to reconcile with God. He did not die at the scaffolding and instead was buried alive.

The results was ‘a rumbling and tumbling in his grave that the very earth was raised’. It is also said that his former house is still haunted after he rose from the grave and crawled back to town.

Additional bits? Well it seems that the source of the story is not vampiric, although mentioned on the History Channels Vampire Secrets series… the source comes from ‘Satan’s Invisible World’ published in 1685 by a gent named George Sinclair and whilst it mentions him coming back as a ghost it does not mention anything about a physical body rising from the grave.

Whilst the story may have adapted or been changed the basis of this one seems more with the other plane than it does with earthly risings.

Another blog on the matter.

Vampire_Secrets

Vampire Secrets” by Derived from a digital capture (photo/scan) of the VHS or DVD Cover (creator of this digital version is irrelevant as the copyright in all equivalent images is still held by the same party). Copyright held by the film company or the artist. Claimed as fair use regardless.. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia.

In 1730, Hungary, there is an account of a strange series of events that were recorded by Count de Cabreras about some of the Counts’ men being stationed in Haidemaque. It was common for soldiers to end up staying in the villagers homes, and one of them was sat with the host of the house one evening, the family and friends there were sat around that night. Another soldier, the man did not know him, came in and everyone seemed nervous about his arrival but no one raised their voice to ask him to leave or cause a scene.

The next morning the soldier awoke and discovered that his host was dead, he asked if the additional and unnerving guest had been anything to do with the situation. The other people in the house then gave him a very curious explanation that the mystery guest was the host’s father and that he had been dead and buried for ten years! The soldier found out they were of the belief that the father had come back for his son. Inevitably this strange tale was relayed to other members of his regiment about the curious events. The Count de Cabreras was then informed of this and intrigued he and his men went with a surgeon in order to investigate the tale. The Count was, at the least, satisfied that the people in the house believe their story to be true.

He took his man, and the surgeon, to the graveyard where they located the father’s grave and removed the body. The boy had not decayed, it’s skin and nails had fallen off and there were signs of them growing back. It also seems that he had the blood of the living inside him, and the Count ordered that they remove the man’s head.

The story goes on to say that they asked the villagers if there were any other vampires and they recounted two others for them. One was a man that had died 30 years prior and had come back for meals to his former house on three occasions. The first was the brother who had died, the second was the son and then the third and last visit was that of a servant. All three had died having fallen prey to the vampire and when the body was exhumed they recorded it was in a similar state to the first, this time the Count ordered they they drive a nail into the corpses head.

Villagers then reported sixteen years ago a man who had then came back to take a snack on his two sons. The body again was exhumed and similar notations about it’s condition were made, with the variety of spice being life, the Count ordered the body to be burnt.

Source – Augustine Calmet, The Phantom World

vampirekit

 

A strange tale of a vampiric encounter comes from the 1100’s, once the lord of the estate it lived underneath it and at night it would emerge to attack villagers.

It was also an area with an outbreak of plague at the time, so it could be that the legend could partly be attributed to the rise of the creature in the face of the deaths.

The result of this was the villagers dug up the monster, taking it from its shallow grave and burning it to end its curse. This was also a site used for the filming of the ever popular Harry Potter.