Posts Tagged ‘17th Century’

Lazarus Colloredo and Joannes Baptista Collerado were conjoined twins from Genoa, Italy. The records are of suggestion that they were born around 1617 and died sometime around or after 1646. They toured Europe exhibiting their condition in order to make a living. Their exact date of death does not appear to have been recorded.

The upper body of Joannes and his left leg stuck out of his mobile brothers torso. Joannes did not speak, his eyes were kept closed and his mouth was always open. An account from an anatomist, later on, said that if his breast was pushed it would make him move his hands, ears and lips. Another visitor noted that Joannes had three fingers on each hand, six toes on one foot and seemed only to survive because of the nourishment from his brother.

It is said that Lazarus was a handsome man and when not exhibiting he would cover up his brother with a cloak. Later accounts have him married, siring several children and none of them experienced any unusual medical conditions.

One account suggests that Joannes made non-verbal noises and often at shows was seen to heavily salivate. It seems that Joannes was mainly considered to be a parasitic twin as he hadn’t got fully developed organs. It seems if he had any cognitive abilities that they were very limited and mostly based on responses to it being touched or prodded.

A letter from Dr Augustin Pincet, of Genoa, stated the brothers were born 20th March 1617 to parents Baptista and Pellegrinna Colloredo. Lazarus ate and had normal bowel movements, but Joannes did not suckle but if her milk hit his lips he would lick them as if he was attempting to swallow it. Their mother apparently died in 1620.

In 1638 they toured France and it was recorded that Lazarus had said Joannes head had been much smaller, now it was twice as large as his own. It seems they had also been unwell on more than one occasion, Lazarus had been subject to 20 bleedings but medics never hazarded purgation. They worried it might be too much for the two men sharing the one digestive system.

Another story is that Lazarus had been so fiercely teased in a pub that he struck the man a fatal blow. The man had been killed but Lazarus said that if he were sentenced to death it would in turn kill his innocent brother.

There doesn’t seem to have been any talks about separating them either, perhaps because from the descriptions they would have shared a liver and other vital organs. The area of joining may well have had several main arterial points too. Today it is highly likely they would have separated them early on to give Lazarus a chance at a normal life, the 17th Century techniques however would not have been capable of dealing with such a complicated matter.

Lazarus and Joannes Baptista Colloredo

The cemetery is located in Liverpool and has been recently granted money to restore the Jewish plot. A good thing too as it’s another piece of history that we shouldn’t let go to waste, well that and of course there’s always a good ghost story or point of interest if I’ve dug it up to read about right?

The Dean Road Cemetery is a burial ground that has been used for numerous Jewish families dating back to the 17th Century. It fell into disrepair sometime in the 18th Century, and residents around the area have said they heard children’s screams in the middle of the night or in the houses the doors slammed and furniture would sometimes be found moved without explanation.

Some of the older houses on the street may well have been part of the slave trade, slaves were undoubtedly kept in some horrific conditions in larger homes as the basements could be used to keep them away from prying eyes during the 198th Century. There have been reports of screaming, scratching sounds, loud footsteps, doors shutting and locking… and even possession.

The Cemetery Website

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I’ve driven past the cathedral several times and yet never ventured in, so I think its only fair to mention this one. It may have to go on to the visit list as well. Lincoln Cathedral sits atop a hill that makes it visible around the city.

A 17th Century holyman has been seen climbing the steps up towards the cathedral, a witness as late as 2004 reported that there was a chain around his neck.

The bells have been pealed by unseen hands and a procession of monks have been said to haunt the cloisters.

In the 1960’s a woman named Constance committed suicide by throwing herself from the tower.

Another report is that there is an immovable bloodstain on the floor, this was from a suicide where a stained-glass window master leapt from the gallery.

The cathedral also has a carved out creature, its said he caused chaos in the cathedral until a passing angel transformed him into stone.

 A local made documentary on some ghosts.

They have a pretty long story but I am going to try and summarise the main and interesting points, they are an underground ossuary located to the south of the former city gate. The catacombs hold around 6 million peoples remains   and are the old stone mines, they have had to be monitored due to prior vandalism.

Like many cities that had their Christian dead buried in the consecrated city grounds Paris suffered overcrowding. The dead who were poor were mass buried to ensure that they tried to ease it but by the 17th Century it was all too much and they needed a new method.

New cemeteries were built, larger scaled ones that could accommodate more dead and the abandoned stone mines were chosen so that they could arrange to exhume the dead, and transfer them into the newly appointed catacombs. To begin with the catacombs were just a bone depository but eventually the stones, tomb and bones were arranged into decorations.

During August 1788 the riots from three areas meant that more bodies were brought into the catacombs. Val-de-gráce’s doorkeeper, Phillibert Aspairt, was lost in the catacombs in 1793, his body was found 11 years later and his tomb is at the spot where his body was found. Some of the graffiti there dates back to the 18th Century, Parisian members of the French Revolution also used them too.

Unfortunately it’s not all good, due to the catacombs being under the Paris streets it means that they cannot build any large foundations. And of course the catacombs are a hot-spot of hauntings.