Posts Tagged ‘1867’

Ararat, Australia’s Lunatic Asylum opened in 1867 and was closed in 1998 before reopening again in 2001, as a campus administered by Australian College of Wine. The design was for a town, within a town, with gardens, orchards, vineyards, livestock and at it’s peak had over 500 staff with 63 buildings.

The decommissioning began in the early 90’s when patients began to be transferred to community living or to other facilities. It is now used for wine making and hospitality training but ghost tours operate in various sections of the buildings.

In 130 years its said around 130,000 people died, it was another place that would have used, what are now seen as, barbaric treatments. Consequently it’s seen as one of Australia’s paranormal hotspots.

Nurse Kenry is a ghost who hands around the women’s wing and is said to watch tour groups from one room more often than others.

Old Margaret is a former patient who was forced out in the early 1990’s, supposedly having known nothing else for most of her life, she returned after her death.

Crying, moaning and coldspots are reported throughout and some report banging noises in the former men’s wards despite there being no living inhabitants there any longer.

AraratMentalAsylum.jpg
By http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/pictoria/b/3/6/doc/b36233.shtml[dead link], https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12622836

The so-called event occurred 20th May, 1867 when Stephen Michalak was searching for minerals at Falcon Lake  around 80 miles out from Winnepeg, Manitoba. Whilst searching around Michalak heard the cackling of geese and he looked up to see two glowing oval-shaped objects up on a swift descent. One carried on down and the other stopped, the one that went down was 160 feet away from him.

Naturally curious he went to investigate it, it looked like a bowl with a dome on top and there was a humming sound, along with the stench of sulphur. He said on the rim of the bowl he spotted a door and heard voices, he assumed they were humans but got no response even trying to use several languages.

With no response he ventured to look inside the strange craft, he described what he saw inside as a ‘maze of lights’ and then three panel doors closed it off, he moved back in in doing so put his hands on the outside of it the thing was so hot it burnt his gloves.

The craft took off abruptly it expelled hot air through some sort of gridded vent. The result of this was to set his shirt on fire and an onset of nausea with it. He was examined by doctors a few hours later back in Winnepeg who found burn marks consistent with his description of the vent.

His continuing health problems with the matter brought him back to the clinic a year later and investigators had not discovered any evidence of a hoax and by 1975 there was still no official response from the government. He died in 1999, aged 83 with no change or retractions in his claims.

 

Dead Drunk

“Spirits served here” was the message above the cemetery stations of the London Necropolis Company (LNC), the sign was to show the mourners that they could have alcoholic beverages. I’d suggest it was also a good bit of comedy for permanent residents of Brookwood.

Drunken behaviour was reported but not specific to the stations, on one occasion in the 1850’s a caretaker refused to allow two mourners to board as they were too intoxicated. On another a ticket collector found a group of passengers were so drunk they were dancing around their carriage on the return journey.

12th January 1867 a Necropolis train driver had a liquid lunch at the local whilst waiting and when he returned was clearly incapable of driving. The fireman took over until they reached Waterloo and the driver was handed his notice.

The company said that they would supply all future train crews with a ploughman’s and beer for lunch. I think that’s a lunch many of us could agree too.

Other London funeral Trains

There were rival trains that ran between King’s Cross and the Great Northern Cemetery at New Southgate, started in 1861 that carried on for at least six years. The service ran from Rufford Street, N1 which is not demolished. It had the advantage of being only a fifteen minute journey.

Just like the LNC the King’s Cross terminus had it’s own mortuary facilities. The funeral trains there ended some time between the years of 1867 – 1873. The station at the cemetery end was then demolished In 1904.

South Station Chapel

The station chapel has been carefully restored by St Edward Brotherhood, who are an orthodox order of monks. They worship at the chapel and maintain a shrine there containing the bones of St Edward the Martyr.