Posts Tagged ‘1952’

Paris in the 1890’s had the best nightlife around, especially for the morbidly curious. Many clubs sought (and still do) to be the most unique in order to get the cash flowing.

One of these was the Caberet du Néant (The Cabaret of Nothingness) where patrons could sit on coffins and served Libations by monks and funeral attendees. The drinks were themed this way and so it meant that the whole thing was a night out away from the mundane.

Having had a few in the ‘sale d’intoxication’ they would move to other rooms, the revelry would include parlour tricks like making the illusion that they were turning into skeletons as they walked through. It is unfortunate but the club did not survive World War II.

You couild also go to Cabaret de l’Emfer (The Cabaret of the Inferno) which was satanically themed. The club had people witness a snake turn into a devil, were heckled by the devil himself and even warned about going further in due to the heat of hell. It’s amusing to note that anecdotes from the time say that people actually complained it was chilly however!

The Cabaret de l’Enfer was still around for a while, the last picture was taken in 1952. It is of the outside with a policeman walking past it.

Not everyone would want the darkest of sides, so relief there was also the Caberet du Ciel, (the Cabaret of the Sky) where Dante and Father Time would greet their visitors.

Today we have themed pubs, but I can’t help these places paved the way for lovely and interesting things by being just that too.

Antonin Alexander

Carl Tanzer, Feb 8th 1877 to July 3rd 1952, was a German-born radiologic technologist in Key-West, Florida, USA who developed a particularly morbid obsession for Elena Milagro de Hoyos, a tuberculosis patient. During his childhood and later in Genoa, Italy, he claimed he had been visited by a dead ancestor who revealed the face of his true love, her face was one of an exotic dark-haired woman.

22nd April 1930, de Hoyos came to the hospital for an examination, she was brought in by her mother. He recognised her as the woman from the visitations of his ancestor. De Hoyos was diagnosed with TB, a fatal disease at the time and eventually despite Tanzler’s best efforts she succumbed to the disease.

Tanzer paid for her funeral, with the permission of the family he then commissioned the construction of an above ground mausoleum. It was constructed in the Key West Cemetery and he visited there pretty much most nights. To be honest this already seems to rate high on the WTF list, but it gets more bizarre.

April, 1933 Tanzer crept into the mausoleum and stole her body, taking her home and here he said her spirit would visit. He claimed she often asked him to take her from the grave, and so it seems he did. What he did to preserve her sounds like a work of horror fiction. Her bones were attached together by wire and coat hangers, her face was fitted with glass eyes and as the corpses skin decomposed he would replace it with silk cloth, soaked in wax and plaster of Paris.

Her hair was replaced by using Hoyo’s wig hair, who gave him the hair? Well her mother had collected her hair for a wig and gave it to him after her death. I am still wondering why but at this point the story continues…

Tanzer filled her chest and abdominal cavity with rags to keep her in her original form, then dressed her, put on stockings and jewellery and kept her body in his bed. He then used a lot of fragrances, detergent and preserving agents to mask the msells. Yes I am still going, I did say it was morbid.

October 1940 (Seven years later) her sister visited Tanzley, she had heard odd rumours, Florida authorities were notified when she saw the truth for herself. He was found to be mentallyl competent, he was charged with destruction of the grave and theft of the body. Bizarrely he never had to defend himself because the case was dropped, the statute of limitations for the crime had expired. Even more upsetting for her family the body was put on display at the Dean-Lopez Funeral Home and around 6,800 ish people came to see it.

Eventually she was reburied at the cemetery but to prevent tampering it was an unmarked grave. Strangely it seems the public mood was that sympathy for a hopeless romantic should be given to Tanzler. I can’t help but think that’s not quite the reaction I’d have had… later there was a claim that he had inserted a tube into her vagina too but this evidence has been met with scepticism, mostly because other than the rumour there appears to be no evidence…

Separated from the woman’s body he then used a death mask to create a life-sized effigy of Hoyos, the effigy lived with him until he died 3rd July. 1952. He was found on the floor three weeks after his death and died under the name Carl Tanzer.

Ripley’s Believe It Or Not museum in Key West, Florida has an exibit that recreats the caring he did to her body. And Svbway to Sally have a video themed around it.

Carl Tanzler (1940)

Another one of the paranormal ship entries, there is no mention of her in the Lloyd’s Shipping Register (a register that classifies the ship and stays live on there until it’s sank, wrecked, hulled or scrapped) it’s existence comes with some scepticism. It’s also appeared as an entry in paranormal magazines such as Fortean Times, as it was apparently shipwrecked in Indonesian waters, the crew had died in mysterious circumstances and it may be that it is more fiction than fact.

The first reference in English surfaces in 1952, and has had mentions since then seem to be rumours of hand-me downs with nothing conclusive. Prior to that in 1948 a series of Dutch-Indonesian articles told of a shop, not specifically using that name, that was located with a sole survivor.

Before he died the man told the missionary that found him, that the ship had been carrying badly stowed sulphuric acid. The crew perished from the poisonous gasses and the missionary told the story to an Italian author.

It is possible that the boat was smuggling illegal cargo, maybe it was renamed for that purpose? The idea of it carrying potential chemicals that could mix would then not be completely unlikely, mixed together in a bad situation it would be either gasses or an explosion in potential.

Another theory given was leaking carbon monoxide from an undetected smouldering fire, or a malfunctioning boiler system. It could lead to the crew’s death and also to a fire that could destroy the vessel.

Another theory that came from the paranormal field is that the crew had been picked up/attacked by a UFO or some form of paranormal force prior to their death.

With no evidence of the ship and varying theories I’ll leave this one in your hands.

 

(Picture from the HMS Victory when I visited some time ago)

 

cabins

In 1952 a report of a haunting came from Transkei, Zulu Africa. It is an intriguing little tale that started in a cottage, relating to Margaret Leigh and her husband who lived there at the time. Margaret was there at a mission hospital doing occupational therapy. Her husband was there doing research work. Both stayed in the cottage which was in a dry, dusty landscape.

A friend came to visit and Margaret was playing with her cat, Tivy. The friend said at the time that Margaret seemed to be acting rather broody too.

Not long after the visit they started to receive a knock at the door, Tivy would get into the window to see who it was but when they opened the door there was no one there. Eventually they got a little fed up of the rapping and didn’t bother to answer. This would confuse guests who would then go to the door to find an empty spot where the knocking person should have been.

When the ghost entered he would shuffle across from the door to sit on the couch, then he would go to a cupboard in the wall and back again. A local man said it sounded like “Cousin John” that used to live there and that he was probably checking for drinks. Cousin John’s wife would lock them in there as she was against drinking. They never had any children either.

After the birth of Margaret’s first child they found that the haunting stopped. Eventually Margaret and the family headed back to England but three years later they came to visit the cottage and Tivy. The new owners asked, without prompt, about the ghost.

Margaret said that the wife must be pregnant but they did not seem too convinecd. Nine months later they definitely were when the wife gave birth.