Posts Tagged ‘1958’

The cemetery doesn’t really have an official name; instead it’s a little place that might well have been given a history thanks to the Las Vegas Mafia, who may well have used it as a great place to dispose of their snitches, thieves and troublemakers. The pet cemetery is used perhaps as a luscious rouse to the more nefarious activities… Next to Rover the Dog you might well be inadvertently paying respect to a former snitch or otherwise.

Even with the help of Google earth and modern satnav etc. it is still quite hard to find, and then you have the speculation of the Mafia which may well put many off heading to the site anyway. If you try to find it then the best information I got was take the 95/93 from Las Vegas towards Boulder city and then about half way between the 95 changes towards Laughlin, you need to turn off there for a few miles then opposing lanes split in two, take the first possible U-turn, drive back the way you came for a few seconds before the lanes come back together. Right before this lane merges you will see a dirt track on the right and an open white gate that leads to the beginning of the cemetery.

The creation and abandonment of the cemetery seems to also go with the rise and fall of the Mafia success. Stories on the internet go around about a Boulder City veteran who wanted a place to bury his pets, so it was created in 1953 by said gent, Marwood Doud. Another says that it was a civil engineer that year, Emory Lockette, who offered a pet funeral service for fifty dollars per pet. The two stories might well have merged at some point but at least the year is consistent so I will go with 1953.

The fact does remain that the cemetery was placed on federal land and therefore built illegally so no official name was given, possibly to help avoid it being found. Later on it was acquired by Boulder City but there is still no firm decision on what will be done with it, so it’s still pretty much abandoned and for the most part lost to many.

The earliest of the graves are from the 50’s and are closest to the road, and many are in poor shape, having gone or on the verge of doing so. The graves are small and would have been bordered with little wooden fencing; some of the remnants still remain. The layout shows that they are arranged in a linear fashion with plays to keep it neat and orderly as the grounds expanded. The further you travel around the three acre land you see that some are more complex graves, with more creative displays involved.

Amongst the pets you find dogs, cats, rabbits, a fish named Spike II and a little hidden gem, a headstone for Flash, the son of the TV star Rin Tin Tin IV. He was groomed to be the star of the 50’s show but was replaced due to the poor screen showing, he was nominated for an award in 1958 and 1959 despite that.

The graves show a lot of love to the former pets and some make a slightly more ghostly allure because they have lights on them that come on at sundown, which leads me into ghostly tales. There is really only one mentioned in a couple of places with brief lines, about a friendly ghost kitty that will follow you to the gates if you visit at night.

In regards to the Mafia story it seems a little unlikely for body dumping, given how well it seems to have been constructed for the pets. The area is susceptible to flash floods and would make it likely to be a place where the bodies would be found too quickly, natural erosion of the desert would push the heavier bodies downstream from their original locations. Graves could be dug up by coyotes and other desert inhabitants, this is shown where they have dug up little ‘mittens’ etc. and exposed buts of fur etc.

Really this seems more like a little hidden gem of a history of showing love for pets, not a Mafia dumping ground, and it’s a shame that it’s likely to end up lost entirely one day due to it’s location.

Thought by UFOlogists to be part of a series of at least 716 Circular Stone discs, dating back around 12,000 years. On these stones tiny hieroglyphics may be found, there is, however no evidence of their existence.

Supposedly they were given to Tsum Um Nui for study in 1958, by 1962 he claimed to have deciphered them about a story of spacecraft which had landed and contained the Dropa people. Unable to leave Earth they then had to adapt to it, he then claimed that the local Ham tribesmen then hunted the Dropa people down.

In 1962 it is said he published his findings and then apparently went in to self-exile. It’s said that he died not long after he completed his manuscript.

Tsum Um Nui is not, according to the claims, a real Chinese name and there is no mention of him within China outside of the Dropa Stones. It is said that the stones were housed in several of the Chinese Museums but again there seems to be no records of this happening.

Arundel Castle, Sussex in England is said to be a pretty active place, and even the first Earl of Arundel is said to remain there. The Earl originally built the castle and is said to still haunt the keep.

Another spirit there seems to have a tragic history, a woman struck with grief following a tragic love affair threw herself from one of the towers. Traditionally seen in white the young lady appears to re-enact the death, suggesting that perhaps she is more of a playback/residual haunt that occur on moonlit nights.

“Blue Man” also gets a mention here, he is seen in the library and has been reported since 1630’s. It is possible he is a cavalier due to the time period. Another curious spirit that is mentioned is a white owl-like bird, it is also considered to be some form of death omen for any Castle resident.

And where would any good castle in England be without some mention of a terrible dark affair? I bring you a servant that was beaten to death who now haunts the kitchen. He has been seen scrubbing pots and pants and in the area a footman back in 1958 spotted someone near the servants quarters after being assured he was alone, he followed the spectre to find that it disappeared when he got close.

Planning a trip over? Let me know if you ever do and what you see!

Roads, streets and highways are all subject to the lore of a phantom vehicle and other strange phenomena. I’ve already touched on phantom hitchhikers but what about other myths and legends?

America

Annie’s Road in New Jersery, USA is the the site of local haunted legends. A woman supposedly killed on the road continues to haunt it. The area is located in Totowa, NJ and on the first half of River View Drive. A quick internet search will show you that there are several local myths about this one, including a need to put on old music to draw her out as you drive down but you will also find just as many comments about how this is nothing more than another Urban Legend.

Boy Scout Lane, is located in Wisconsin and it a dead-end road with no outlet. This appears to be an urban legend or something taken from pure fiction and lifted into semi-myth fact. Basically they say that there was the death of a fictional troop of Boy Scouts. There are however no records of either fatalities or mystery disappearances but despite this is remains an area where people try to conduct paranormal investigations.

Clinton Road, United States is another one of those with a tale that I find a little more like an old myth or urban legend that includes alleged sightings of ghosts, strange creates, witches, Satanists and even the Ku Klux Klan? If you go to the bridge at the reservoir at midnight and throw a penny (or maybe a cent who knows) into the water it will then be thrown back by the ghost of a boy who drowned there. Not content with one ghost there is a possibility of running into a Camaro being driven by a girl who crashed it in 1988 (and if you mention that event she is more likely to appear). Of course if two ghosts isn’t enough how about two more? There are also supposedly two park rangers that haunt the Terrace Pond area.

England

A616 road or Stockbridge Bypass connects Newark-On-Trent to the M1. When it was being constructed staff reported encounters with a ghostly monk who may have been from the nearby Hunshelf Priory. However I could not find any recent records about it. Harry Unsworth was a lorry driver in 1958 who reported that he gave a lift to a Hitchhiker. He dropped the man off and then he re-appeared again without explanation some miles down the road… This was reported more than once in the 50’s.

Coulds Hill near Wareham in Dorset has worried some drivers, hearing the sound of a powerful engine (more exactly it suggests a 1920’s Brough Superior Motorcycle) that sped around followed by sounds of screeching tyres and then an eerie silence. Nobody has seen the rider but it’s been theorised it was World War One hero Lawrence of Arabia who was killed in a spot nearby in a similar accident.

The “Phantom Lorry of Cheshire” has been reported stalks the Hyde to Mottram  road. As far back as February 1930 the shadowy truck has been blamed for causing drivers to crash when they serve to avoid a suddenly appearing vehicle coming out of a side road that is not there upon inspection.

Between Blanford and Salisbury (Wiltshire) motorists are often shocked by a phantom wreckage by the side of the road with screams and groans of the crash victims. Other have said they have seen a ghostly-face of a man, felt the icy touch of a hand and even to have seen a severed bloody hand on the floor!

Elsewhere!

E8 Expressway, or the Karak Expressway in Kuala Lumpur suffers the report of being one of the most haunted roads in Malaysia. Many people report seeing strange creatures and Pontianak on the road.

“Uniondale Phantom Hitchhiker” is on the N9 Road in South Africa on the road between Uniondale and Willowmore, in the semi-desert of Karoo. A girl named Marie Charlotte Roux died in a road accident on that stretch of the N9, April 12th, 1968 (Good Friday)

What a strange tourist attraction this is… basically the local people who did not keep the yearly payments up on their graves were going to have the bodies dug up and the grave reused.  There are 119 mummies on display.

The soil properties, the dry climate and time appear to have naturally mummified the bodies and in some cases their clothing. The bodies were put on display at “El Museo de las Momias” and are those buried during a cholera outbreak, it is possible that has contributed to their state.

The bodies were from people that had died between 1865 and 1958. The law stated that the graves had to have a yearly payment but around 90%  of the bodies had to be desinterred due to non paymemt, around 2% of them naturally mummified. A law stopped the practise in 1958 but the original mummies were moved into the museum so people can pay to see them.

It’s not something for the faint of heart, I would advise before clicking on the video that you take into consideration there are some children and other subjects in there that may be upsetting.

Due to the spread of the disease and epidemic of cholera the dead were buried quickly, unfortunately some of these bodies were buried alive.  The museum is a bit of a creepy place but as with all things I find, it peaked my curiosity. One of the things I did find interesting is that the original Nosferatu film maker Werner Herzog took movies of them to assist him with the authenticity of the film!

Perhaps more terrifying than the original mummy video – a song by Toyah Wilcox devoted to it!