Posts Tagged ‘Black Magic’

A woman stumbled into Ennery, Haiti on 24th October 1936 in a terrible state. Her eyes were diseased and her eyelashes had fallen out, she was dressed in rags and walking barefoot. She hated direct sunlight and is cited as a famous zombie case, brought to the Western culture by American folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. She was looking for some confirmation about the zombie phenomena because of soldiers and sailors bringing back stories about them.

‘Felicia’ was said to have spoken in a very flat and emotionless way, she displayed little interested in anything and her laugh was flat and lacked real mirth. She was quite indifferent to events around her and an X-ray taken put into doubt that she might ever have been Felicia as they did not match, the original woman had suffered a fractured leg but there was no sign of this on the recently deceased woman.

The woman attracted a crowd and a local family, the Mentors, said she looked like a deceased relative called Felicia who died in 1907, aged 29 years-old. She was taken home to the family but was transferred to a state hospital a few days later. Hurston thought that what had happened was due to drugs or poison and not due to black magic.

The case for the drug/poison case is due to the postulation that tetrodotoxin (derived from puffer fish) is used in the bokor’s mixture used in Black Magic rituals. Wade Davis went out to look into it and found that they made their ‘zombie powders’ from various animal parts and plants. It was the use of this in various formats that could cause the brain-washed and lethargic nature of the victims they chose, before burial they looked dead and the bokor would then ‘revive’ them later. To get the dosage right would be something precise too, it could fail as often as it was recorded to succeed, and a bokor is hardly likely to hand over their secrets that easily either.

Dr Louis P Mars suggested that rather than her being a case as a zombie she was more likely to have been suffering schizophrenia. Unfortunately it was only a few weeks of survival, she died in the hospital.

Another interesting fact about these zombie cases is that it is a criminal offence in Haiti, under the Haitian Penal Code (Article 246) it is illegal to create a zombie, it is on par with murder only the victim is technically still alive.

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A small note on the picture. Whilst most sites are using this picture as Felicia I cannot verify this as her actual image.

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Newark castle is just down the road from me, here in Nottingham and I went once over a decade ago. It sits by a river which some say might explain this as some experts in the field believe water is a good way to enhance paranormal activity. I’ll admit when I went the most interesting thing that happened was my friend getting stuck up the wall he’d decided to climb…

During the day the park and castle area are busy with the living, there are less accessible these days as the dungeons are locked off for safety reasons and those that have ventured down say it goes very cold, very quickly and more so than they’d have expected. One account from a visitor in the past stated that voices could be heard.

In 1073 the manor on the land was turned into a castle and the then Bishop of Lincoln, Robert Bloet, added a motte and baily. About 50 years later another bishop made it into a fully fortified castle and area. The castle withstood five sieges and until 1646, was a key royalist stronghold and following it’s surrender it was opened up for royal guests to use. One of the most famous royals that came to visit was King John. He died at the castle 19th October 1216, it is said that he was poisoned by order of the pope.

The castle was due to be destroyed but then the plague broke out, the orders were not completed and some of the castle stayed standing. Four rooms remain in tact at the castle site, one is the bedroom King John died in. The undercroft is another room in tact and rumours are that it was used between the 1750’s and 1900’s as a place of practise for black magic. The dungeons there were rumoured to be a meeting place for the Knights Templars.

The King’s bedroom was also the scene of a suicide in the early 1900’s, a castle range was found hanging there. He was swinging by his neck and tour guides have walked into the room to see a body hanging from the ceiling, moaning and crying as if trying to catch it’s breath.

They say in the dungeon that voices and sometimes chanting can be heard. Inside them accounts have been made of cans and stones thrown from the shadows. Flashes of light have been spotted around the grounds at night and those who have done a vigil in the undercroft felt a presence in the room too.

Newark Castle, 06-2013 (3).jpg
Newark Castle, 06-2013 (3)” by Richard NevellOwn work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

This is another pretty famous case for avid ghost lovers, the Genesee County Poor Farm was there to taken in those eligible for assistance. The Farm is located between Bufallo and Rochester, NY and is a popular destination for ghost hunters, it is an enormous building and in it’s time it house paupers, drunkards, lunatics, blind, lame, handicapped, orphans, windows and a murderer or two.

The idea of these farms is not unusual, they were quite popular in the 19th and 20th Century around the United States, they were government run facilities and the original building was a tavern. A notice of declaration about the change went out to the Batavia Times Newspaper, it was December 9th 1826. Residents of any nature were referred to as inmates, and the physically able worked on the farm allowing the costs of living to be reduced. Sadly the cemetery attached to the grounds there has been neglected and has faded away, no plot plans or registry for their graves has been discovered as of yet.

It opened 1st January, 1827 and then in the 1950’s became a Country Home and Infirmary, then in the 1990’s was a set of shops and antiques mall. People mentioned the experiences of disembodied voices, screams in the night, shadows and further stories. With a rumour of over a 1000 deaths at the place over it’s years of operations it’s no surprise that ghosts have become part of it’s history.

I was rather skeptical about the Black Magic story but I shall add it here for reference, there are some rumours on the sites I checked that they believe there was a history of Satanic Rituals on the site. It is said that nurses working there may have practised these things and were not above using this on patients and inhabitants, there was also mention of them taking babies for sacrifices and further rumours of it still happening today.

Case Manager, Suzie Yencer relates one chilling experience: “It was September 2007. While working a public hunt, we had a gentleman with us that was filming a documentary about the building. He wanted to try an experiment in one of the rooms. The room he chose was in the basement, popularly known as The Christmas Room. The experiment he wanted to try was to sit in the room with no lights or equipment on. The only light we would use was a pink glow stick in the middle of a circle of people. We also placed a small ball and a toddler size rocking horse in the circle. The gentleman conducting the experiment requested that only I talk and try to make contact with the spirits. The more I talked, the more strange occurrences began to happen. The glow stick started to move back and forth, and the rocking horse began to slowly rock. A few of the guests in the room including myself saw a hand and arm come out of nowhere and reach for the ball in the circle and then just vanish….”

It’s proven popular enough to have been visited by Ghost Adventures and TAPS, whether or not you believe the shows it’s certainly drummed up interest in the place itself.