Posts Tagged ‘Bodies’

Lucedio Abbey, located near Trino, north-west Italy was founded in 1124, and one of the earliest Cistercian monasteries in Italy. The abbey was secularised in 1784, and today the abbey buildings are part of a nice farm. There is restoration work being undertaken according to wikipedia so that could be promising for aspiring future visitors.

It is said to be cursed by the monks that once resided there. In 1684 many young girls were said to have been visited by the devil in their dreams, he sent them to the abbey and they corrupted the monks into satanism. A history of torture and abuse became so notorious that it reached Pope Pio VI in Rome and the abbey was closed.

It is said that in one room of the abbey a pillar gets wet, some believe it is crying due to the horrific experiences of the past. It could just be a leak… just saying.

An evil presence is said to be buried under the crypt, guardians there had to sit around in a circle. The abbots that died were buried in a circle around it and they naturally appeared to have mummified around that way.

Italian Language Link from Wikipedia

 

Lucedio Abbey” by Original uploader was Georgius LXXXIX at it.wikipedia – Originally from it.wikipedia; description page is/was here.. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Lucedio_Abbey

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July 1947, for alien conspiracy claims this is the cracker!

A rancher found metal debris on the ground outside his place in Roswell, New Mexico. America was gripped in ‘flying saucer fever’, the claims were rapidly dismissed by officials as debris from a weather balloon in an accident.

But the alien craft and bodies had supposedly already been taken away, witnesses spoke of holes in the desert grounds, of covert ops to bring the ship down to ground and then in 1995 the mysterious Roswell autopsy video surfaced. The video shows the supposed ‘grey’ alien being autopsied. There are enough video’s around about the debunk vs authenticity that you can probably google a fair whack in a night.

Despite the US Air Force still stating that it was a weather balloon the rumours carry on to this day.

In 2006 the video was finally proven to be a hoax, the video was made by Ray Sentilli who was a London-based video maker. He admitted that it was a reconstruction of a video that he claimed originally existed however that was lost, he stated that there were a few of the original films in survival however they don’t seem to have been brought forwards for checking.

If you are looking for a comedic look at this with some terribly English humour, then Alien Autopsy is a good light relief film.

A fictionalized version of the creation of the footage and its release was retold in the comedy film Alien Autopsy (2006).

Recently I went on a trip with friends out to Italy, more specifically Venice. We stayed around the Lido area which is around three kilometres away from the abandoned island of Poveglia. In the port at San Marco we saw a ship called Poveglia and we took it upon ourselves to ask them if the boat did indeed go there… blank faces. This was a similar event when we asked the local police too, seems it was not a well heard of place.

The island itself is not on the main routes, and there are no tourists being guided around. I had hoped we’d find out a way to get there but sadly not. However this hasn’t deterred me from recounting this curiosity. I am sure someone may be able to correct me where I go wrong. (Hope so anyway).

The Island seems to have a lengthy history attached to it, records suggest that in the 9th Century it was fairly well populated but had suffered plenty of wars and attacks. In 1379 Venice came under conflict and the people from Poveglia were moved to the Giudecca. The Venetian government built a permanent fortification on the Island; the Octagon there is still visible today. It remained uninhabited until it was offered to the Camaldolese monks in 1527, they refused to take it. In 1661 descendants were then offered the Island but again it was refused. It was still left empty and abandoned.

1777 saw the Island being used by the Public Health Office who used it as a check point for goods and people as they came and went through Venice. 1793 saw the plague changing the island once more, several cases of the plague on two ships meant that it was a temporary confinement place for the ill. It was a place made permanent in 1805, and the church of San Vitale there was destroyed, the old bell tower was then converted into a lighthouse. It was closed down in 1814.

The 20th Century was used as a quarantine station once more, and then in 1922 the buildings that were left had been converted to a hospital for the mentally-ill and for long-term care. This was the case until 1968 when the hospital was closed, the island was used for a while after that but now is closed off.

So on to the creepy bits? That’s what we’re here for right?

The mental asylum doctor was no doubt given his tyrannical legend like so many others of the time, due to practising lobotomy and other, now, barbaric practises. He was tortured by his patients, went “mad” and then jumped to his death from the bell tower. However the story says that he survived and was then strangled by a mist from the ground.

Other sources say that so many people were buried and burnt during the time of the plague that the ground is half human-remains. The local fishermen will give it a wide berth to ensure they will not fish up the bones of ancestors and a stay overnight would most like produce interesting tales, Ghost Adventure’s went that way themselves and discovered this to be much the case. The locals are either unaware of this place, or will feign disinterest leaving only the more curious and grizzly minded wanting to go there.

A rather good first account from someone that has visited can be located here: MENTAL FLOSS

Poveglia Googled

In Dublin, Ireland, there is St Michan’s Church and underneath it lays the crypts. There are five long burial vaults with the mummified remains of 17-19th Century notable families.

Though there is no exact date of origin they may date from when the church was rebuilt in 1685, the dry atmosphere appears to have been a factor in the mummies and their preserved coffins. The limestone walls mean the area is dry and perfect for creating the natural conditions required for these mummies.

It is believed that Bram Stoker, creator of the novel Dracula, visited the vaults in the company of his family.

One of the vaults houses a man known as “Crusader” though his body is only around 650 years old (other sites say 400). Looking around at stories for him I have conflicting tales but one says his feet were taken off due to being so tall, for some reason they also removed his right hand.  Another site told me the man was over six feet tall, yet another claims it was over eight feet?

There are also the various bodies laid here of those that held the title Earl of Leitrim. Don’t pop by on a Sunday though just to visit the crypts as they are closed so that the residents can enjoy their normal services.

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Warning – fairly lengthy post for me!

London was and remains a large scale part of English history, past and future. During the pre-Victorian and through the Victorian period finding a place to bury the dead was no easy task. London’s capital for instance had doubled in a short space, with it came the dead and more need to inter them.

Finding a cemetery that could be used for the purpose could be just as difficult as picking a first home. Cemetery space was at a prime, people needed the space and bodies were left in terrible states around the capital city. Regularly graves were desecrated and re-used, disinterred bones were left scattered across grounds. It wasn’t just cemeteries either but the results of this terrible lack of organisation meant that there was a great deal of risk for disease with the material from decomposing bodies entering drinking wells and springs.

1848-1849 saw a cholera outbreak that killed nearly 15,000 Londoners and made it very obvious that there was a drastic need to sort the situation out. A brilliant description of some of the problems was documented by G A Walker in his Gatherings from Graveyards, I have been very lucky to obtain a copy and if I get chance will scan some pages in at later date.

In 1849 Sir Richard Broun came up with an answer, he proposed buying a large area of land to build a massive cemetery. The 2,000 acre plot would be his Necropolis and at a distance of 25 miles from London posed little to no risk of seeing the same issue arise. He proposed that the railway line from Waterloo to Southampton could offer a way to transport coffins and mourners alike…

The idea of a railway link to rural cemeteries had been thought about before he presented his ideas but not everyone seemed convinced, the clamour and bustle of a train would detract from the dignified Christian funeral. Also would it not be somewhat offensive to have a body in a coffin on a train where the family and friends were already suffering, and then treat like some form of conveyor  belt affair?

The idea of rail travel was still a new thing anyway, but Waterloo line was completed 1848 and the first Necropolis Station came along six years after that. In June 1852 an Act of Parliament was passed which created The London Necropolis and National Mausoleum Company, it was later shortened to The London Necropolis Company. London & South Western Railway were the partner’s and they estimated £40,000 a year from it. It was decided however that the trains used would have to be a separate service, it was not a good idea to put a funeral party near mainstream passenger services and potentially drive away both.

There was another concern about how the varying religions and classes would be addressed using the service and so there were two stations. One served the conformist area on the sunny south side and the other served the non-conformists on the chilly north side. The class tickets also came into play, the dead were also split into the classes too.

Brookwood Cemetery grounds were consecrated 7th November 1854, six days later the world’s first funeral train was ready to go. The York Street terminus was restricting its passenger services, and if the company was going to expand it needed Waterloo and to demolish York Street terminus. A long period of negotiations went on and the London Necropolis was persuaded to give up it’s York Street post for a replacement 999-year lease, low rent and compensation along with a new supply train with return tickets for the mourners to use on the SWR more expensive trains at their own low cost.

The Act of Parliament meant the tickets prices for the Funerary side were fixed until 1939, Golfer’s going to nearby West Hill Golf Club would take advantage by dressing up as mourners. The remains of a rough footpath are still seen at the cemetery, it’s suggested the cheapskate golfers caused it. So far the history of the Funeral Rail service looked promising however in October 1900 the Necropolis Railway dropped Sunday services from it’s timetable and the trains went into decline until they ran once or twice a week. Finally the new motor hearse posed a new threat but this did not cause the end of its days, the German Luftwaffe did.

Bombs, April 16th 1941 was one of the worst nights of the London Blitz. The Necropolis train was berthed and did not escape, the area was levelled and only the platforms remained. It would have been too expensive it replace it and although the Necropolis Service ended in 1941 there is some evidence coffins were conveyed to Brookwood by rail into the 1950’s.