Posts Tagged ‘medicine’

Not the kind where you run up and down the stairs until you feel light headed. The genuine practise of banishment of spirits/demons possessions. I won’t go on about the obvious film(s) covering this genre but I will mention that this is something controversial to many people.

Medical studies suggest that the following can be contributing to the delusion/belief that someone is possessed.

  • Automatism, someone acting in a mechanical or involuntary manner.
  • Gilles de la Tourette’s syndrome, where victims cannot control their language outbreaks or movements.
  • OCD – a need to continue doing what can be seen as irrelevant acts over and over again.
  • Some form of mental disorder (eg schizophrenia)
  • Xonolalia,. where a person begins to speak a language fluently that was previously unknown
  • deep-rooted psychological problems that have not been addressed correctly

“O sacardos Christi, tu scis me esse diabolum. Cur me derogas?” Latin ‘O Priest of Christ, you know that I am the Devil. Why do you keep bothering me?’

As an example one Father states that of 500,000 referred exorcism’s he believed that 84 of them were genuine cases of possession. According to an independent report hey should refer to a doctor and then only aim for a priest as a last resort.

The practise is not something that is exclusively Christian/Catholic and I believe it’s worth noting this. Most of the horrors we see on our screens involving the subject are based on the Catholic rites but there are rites of this nature in Hinduism, Judaism and Islamic texts.

Which brings me nicely on to a small passion I have outside of the blog, anime and cosplay.  With all the serious posting above I’d like to share a trailer for an anime I am currently enjoying.

You’ve no doubt seen pictures on the web or on someone’s phone of say a two-headed cow, unnaturally grown bones, humans with horns r tails and thought yeah really? Nice use of photoshop.

Teratology is the study of the reality of birth-defects, abnormal development and may extend to include delayed developmen with any case that may not present an immediate structural abnormality.

An estimated 10% of birth defects are caused by exposure to teratogenic agents during the prenatal period. These agents may be drugs, medication, infections, diseases or environmental exposures to name but a few.

A pretty useful resource for a person with a passing curiosity would be the Mutter Museum.

Is better known as Cotard Delusion, a rare mental disorder where the sufferer believes they are dead (figuratively or literally). They are convinced they no longer exist, may be rotting, have lost all their blood and in rarer still cases, may be convinced they are immortal.

A French neurologist, Jules Cotard, was the first to describe the strange condition. This goes back to an earlier post describing Capgras, in that similar traits occur. The sufferer can even feel no sense of association with their own face, this can then lead to further confirmation that they do not exist.

It is a disorder encountered mostly through a sufferer of an already present disorder such as schizoprenia, but may also be associated with depression, or to adverse reactions to drugs.

An iconic part of the vampire, two of them, good at biting into necks and often seen brandished in horror movies. Some look rather sexy and discreet, others are so large the vampire has to have an adapted physiology or learn to blend in with badly bred white trash/Chav’s…

The image below (google search) shows someone suffering a medical condition called hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. This is a genetic disease but one of the signs is that a majority of the teeth may be shorter and blunter than others. In some this is possibly the distinctive canine look.

All well and good but what if you were bitten by one? Surely that’s not the only reason the bite marks look so strange?

Well allow me to try with another part of it, those bitten by vampires have not always become vampires but perhaps a person who is ill walking about with fang marks might be reason for concern? They may also be suffering a skin condition, such as the one below known as pemphigus vulgaris. To a peasant in the 18th Century such marks were not a skin condition but the signs that a blood-sucker was on their way around the area!