Posts Tagged ‘mental’

Recently I went on a trip with friends out to Italy, more specifically Venice. We stayed around the Lido area which is around three kilometres away from the abandoned island of Poveglia. In the port at San Marco we saw a ship called Poveglia and we took it upon ourselves to ask them if the boat did indeed go there… blank faces. This was a similar event when we asked the local police too, seems it was not a well heard of place.

The island itself is not on the main routes, and there are no tourists being guided around. I had hoped we’d find out a way to get there but sadly not. However this hasn’t deterred me from recounting this curiosity. I am sure someone may be able to correct me where I go wrong. (Hope so anyway).

The Island seems to have a lengthy history attached to it, records suggest that in the 9th Century it was fairly well populated but had suffered plenty of wars and attacks. In 1379 Venice came under conflict and the people from Poveglia were moved to the Giudecca. The Venetian government built a permanent fortification on the Island; the Octagon there is still visible today. It remained uninhabited until it was offered to the Camaldolese monks in 1527, they refused to take it. In 1661 descendants were then offered the Island but again it was refused. It was still left empty and abandoned.

1777 saw the Island being used by the Public Health Office who used it as a check point for goods and people as they came and went through Venice. 1793 saw the plague changing the island once more, several cases of the plague on two ships meant that it was a temporary confinement place for the ill. It was a place made permanent in 1805, and the church of San Vitale there was destroyed, the old bell tower was then converted into a lighthouse. It was closed down in 1814.

The 20th Century was used as a quarantine station once more, and then in 1922 the buildings that were left had been converted to a hospital for the mentally-ill and for long-term care. This was the case until 1968 when the hospital was closed, the island was used for a while after that but now is closed off.

So on to the creepy bits? That’s what we’re here for right?

The mental asylum doctor was no doubt given his tyrannical legend like so many others of the time, due to practising lobotomy and other, now, barbaric practises. He was tortured by his patients, went “mad” and then jumped to his death from the bell tower. However the story says that he survived and was then strangled by a mist from the ground.

Other sources say that so many people were buried and burnt during the time of the plague that the ground is half human-remains. The local fishermen will give it a wide berth to ensure they will not fish up the bones of ancestors and a stay overnight would most like produce interesting tales, Ghost Adventure’s went that way themselves and discovered this to be much the case. The locals are either unaware of this place, or will feign disinterest leaving only the more curious and grizzly minded wanting to go there.

A rather good first account from someone that has visited can be located here: MENTAL FLOSS

Poveglia Googled

Byberry Mental Hospital was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and was opened to the patients in 1907; it was a work farm from 1910-1920 until construction for a larger asylum was began and completed. Asylums were at a popular high and with it came more and more patients, Byberry was one such place. As the population of the patients grew so did the tales of patient abuse and neglect.

Without the right funds for the place the patients were left naked, starving and sleeping in sewage filled halls, not to mention the state of the hospital itself that was in disrepair. The patients would be huddled together in dingy rooms, they did not socialise correctly and they often had little to no supervision.  So imagine the stories of the very worst asylum treatments and you are probably close to their experience.

There were padded cells, they had restraints, they would use solitary confinements and physical punishment. This in turn went with the lobotomies and the electric shock. Byberry was known as a “real life house of horrors” and there were murders and suicides, the heavy handed regime was a part of many patients lives. In 1990 the doors of Byberry were closed by state authorities, there had been an investigation into the place and the awful conditions within its walls.

And so, here goes! There are many stories about Byberry and after it closed it invariably became a den for vagrants, delinquents and satanic cults. It also possibly would have had former inmates returning after it closed as they had no other place of knowledge and would have likely been institutionalized   Underneath the asylum there are catacomb like tunnels that give way to an urban legend, a violent and psychopathic patient hides in waiting with a large knife to slice the throats of anyone in his path.

Of course if that isn’t enough for you, do take note that apparently at some point the Satanic cultists have managed to open a doorway to hell, and here was me thinking Buffy had closed it at her school…

(I have found out that this place is now demolished but decided to post it anyway)

Ever had a song stuck in your head? You heard it on the radio before work and ou just hummed it all day… imagine a full blown musical experience with backing tracks but no one else can hear it.

Are you crazy? Probably not.

The condition was first recorded around a century ago, with phantom songs haunting people. Sufferers described it has a torrent of random songs and music, it seems a lot of those that are victims of this are elderly and often dear or hard of hearing.

Doctors Victor Aziz and Nick Warner have conducted a 15 year long study ino the occurrence. Unlike schizophrenia there are no imaginary voices just a constant stream of music. The average age of the patients was 78, and two-thirds themed the music as being religious.

A handful of PET scans show that area of the brain to be highly active during periods of hallucination. It is possible that the brain creates the hallucinations as a product of mental malfunction.

Case Study

Another Link

A very clever example for auditory hallucinations though not musical.