Posts Tagged ‘Nottingham’

Carrying on from Part One. 

In January 2007 Anwar Rashid brought Clifton Hall for £3.6 million, he had made his money from nursing homes in Dubai and by no means had to worry about finance (and still does not I believe). The pan was to use the Hall for both living and wedding events. 8 months later, the story goes, the family left the property, defaulted the mortgage and refused to go back. He had called in a local paranormal team and said that he had found blood marks on a quilt that was being used for his 18-month-old son, a the time it was quoted like he felt like it was the film “The Others” (side note – not a bad film!)

T.A.P.I.T (The Ashfield Paranormal Investigation Team) based in Sutton in Ashfield were formed in 2006, by Lee Roberts. I listened to an interview he did with at Parasearch Radio and I will go into that in the last part of this little series but before that lets recap and look into more of this story.

Anwar Rashid brought the property, he already had a 25 million fortune and brought the 52 room Hall with 17 bedrooms, a gym, cinema, 10 reception rooms and 10 bathrooms. At the time he was a 32-year-old businessman, with a 25-year-old wife, three daughters and two sons.

He brought the Hall in January 2007, from day one they believed it could be haunted as they said on the  first evening he heard a voice “is anyone there?” but could find no source and so tried to ignore it, he said that it was a man’s voice and that was not the only time they heard it. Nabila Rashid (his wife) saw her eldest daughter watching television at 5am downstairs, she went upstairs only find that she was asleep in her own bed. They also say that some of their family and friends outright refused to stay there to.

May 2007 – the planned license for marriage ceremonies was refused by the council but that didn’t stop them coming up with ideas for other uses on a commercial level.

Stories and dates are quite ambiguous because when I breakdown dates you may find they seem messy and I want to acknowledge that. One report says they left in August 2008 but TAPIT says they left in October 2008 as an example. On report says they stopped paying the bills in January 2008 but that doesn’t fit if they defaulted and left 18th September 2008 when Yorkshire Bank reclaimed the Hall. I believe that this would seem fairer as it coincided with the idea of them handing the keys in during August 2008bu either way they had defaulted and gone in 2008.

21st September 2008, Sky News covered the story, “Millionaire Flees Haunted Mansion”.

“When people used to tell me about ghosts, I would never believe them, and they would say ‘whatever!’. But I would have to tell any new owner that it was haunted having experienced it.”

Darren Brookes, manager at a security firm that used to manage Hall security also supported this view, “a monk walking through the grounds, a woman in the graveyard falling over, and chairs moving in one of the rooms”.

Dark Mansions – “During their stay, the family called paranormal investigators, but these experts could not drive the spirits from the house. In fact, two investigators, fainted after seeing the ghost of a boy”.

This is mentioned in the Parasearch podcast but outside of that I found collecting ‘evidence’ to be more rumours etc but not actual fact or evidence, however TAPIT have not released anything else I could find and I believe it is because Lee Roberts is planning to write a book on the matter and probably holding it all back for that reason.

Another small side note of interest that I found; it was mentioned about rumours of a heart in a casket at the church. The church has not precise date of founding so it was possible that the site was used for worship and predates the church being erected, again the earliest notation comes from the Domesday book, but we can likely designate the transition to a Christian church being around 1150, but before 1200. If you like local church history, I think this would be for you, but I am concentrating on the rumour of the heart.

The Clifton Book – 1906 says that the south side doorway is dated 1632 and opens into the Clifton vault.  There are 25 coffins noted in the book and he states that resting among them is the small leaden casket, he says that from the size and shape it “doubtless” contained a heart, this heart was believe to be from Sir William Clifton, a crusader. There is another mention – 1790 report by Throsby, saying that there was a lead coffin shaped to receive the head and shoulders, for Sir Gervase Clifton who was beheaded after the Battle of Tewkesbury but he did not see it himself.  I think there is genuine merit to the rumour and whilst it won’t be possible to confirm as the vault is going to be tended, and fortunately preserved, by the incumbent clergy it is highly probably this exists.

 The last part of this series is going to be write up of what I listened to, the notes I made and a link to that podcast. Overall, I found it very hard to get enough footage, pictures or further information supporting all the local rumours and events. I don’t dismiss that there have been multiple experiences, but I cannot find you anything more than those reports. BUT I hope you liked the deep dive and you like my photos from a wintery Nottingham village.

                  
         
Sources: 

Wikipedia                            savills.com               History of Nottinghamshire, Vol 1

Telegraph.co.uk                mysteriousbritain.co.uk                nottsalgia.com

Haunted rooms                 theparanormalguide.com            Clifton-vollage.org.uk

Paranormaldatabase.com            Dark Mansions – Dinah Williams

BBC News                           kids.kiddle.co                                    officialleeroberts.com

Google                                 Fortean Times                                   alchetron.com/chek-whyte

Paranormal Network      Find A Grave                                      Parasearch Radio

Sky News                             nottinghamshistory.org.uk          The Clifton Book 1906. Rev Rosslyn Bruce


The Manor/Hall of Clifton is located near the city of Nottingham, the manor now known as Clifton Hall, and for the ease of reading will just be Hall in this blog, was mentioned in the Domesday Book, 1086 and is located at the back of the River Trent and is a Grade I listed building. There is a cliff overlooking the river and in the 1086 Domesday book is noted as being at the top of a hill at the cliff edge of Clifton Village, most likely as this made it a more easily defendable position and is described as a fortified tower house.

It was listed as three stories high and was remodelled in the 18th Century in the Georgian style of architecture. It was largely done between 1778-1797 by Sir Gervase Clifton, he employed architect John Carr of York, it was here that the original house was predominantly demolished. The original domed Hall, built by Sir Robert Clifton was saved and used, the south Hall in Carr’s work and the north wing is of a later date.

The de Clifton family had brought the property from the de Rhodes in the 13th century. In 1896 Sir Harvey Juckes Lloyd Bruce succeeded Henry Robert Clifton. The early Bruce years at Clifton are recorded in the book Silken Dalliance (1946) written by Henry James Bruce. In the 1940’s Lieutenant Colonel Peter Thomas Clifton started to sell off the property and the Hall was sold in 1958, this ended 700 years of the Clifton family ownership.

In 1958 Clifton Hal’s Grammar school for girls opened, for girls aged 11- 18 years and it closed in 1976. The head teacher for the school when it opened was Miss Heron, she died of cancer and was succeeded by Miss Squire, this happened around 1970. I could find no solid date online when I searched. 13th January 1970, a sixth former and 17-year-old, called Sandra Simpkin married 22-year-old Allan Barnes, a widow and she was given a day off from her lessons. The Grammar school closed in July 1976, and another Alumini of note that went there was Jayne Torvill (ice skater).

The Nottingham Trent University, then Trent Polytechnics, used the Hall after that until 2002.

Chek Whyte (Anthony Beardsley) then redeveloped the area, building houses on the ground, converted the Hall into two luxury apartments and 14 houses were listed as build on the south east of the Hall area. In 2007 he appeared on Secret Millionaire, he was then declared bankrupt in 2009 and was £20 million in debt but seems used to the life of a risk taker noting in a statement that he had been in the position before.

In 2007 Anwar Rashid purchased the property for £3.6 million and the family moved in, they used one wing of the Hall as a residency and planned to use the rest as a wedding venue or place for ceremonies. The Clifton Hall profile was raised again when the family left in 2008, having defaulted on their mortgage and allowing the Yorkshire Bank to repossess it, and it is listed for sale at £2.5 million, the reason was not cited as financial difficulty but the persistent danger to the family from paranormal threats. There is a current listing on Savills for the property.

I went to the area, Dec 2019, to look as the rumours about the place have reached an international interest historically and a friend of mine requested this as a blog. So here goes! The church, cemetery and Hall are at the end of the road and parking up I was greeted by a pleasant village view of the church and grounds entrance. St Mary’s is a pleasant churchyard and well kept, it sees current use and I took the time to photograph some of the graves for the website, Find A Grave. I also immediately heard voices in the trees, it was easy to work out that the source of this was ground workers, it was mid-day and there was traffic going into the workplace but it does come across a little weird and eerie as you hear it carrying across from the woods.

The place a history of ghosts and unusual events, Haunted Rooms had an entry, so let’s begin with that. A brief over-view of the history is there and mentions that in 1632 King Charles occupied the bedroom at the top of the winding stairs. I will be mentioning the stairs again later in one of these blog series. The quick summary here says there are dark apparitions of children, unexplained banging or tapping on the doors/walls, unexplained voices like low conversations and bloodstains appearing on bedclothes and floors.

The Paranormal Database also has an entry – The Clifton Family are said to have been warned about an impending family death of a sturgeon [fish] was seen swimming upstream of the Trent.

Local rumours?

One is that a painting used to be in the hall for the daughter of the Colonel, she died in a riding accident at Clifton Grove. Tracey Collins was a pupil there and said that the panting was rumoured to have been of his daughter but she died in a riding accident, instead they painted over the partially done piece and as a tribute a female foot on the colonel is actually what is left of her in her memory. This local legend has been disproven but the story still knocks around, the reason it was disproved as down to the fact that both daughters outlived their father and went on to marry. There is also nothing supernatural about it, but it is another weird local legend.

I also found a story from the Grammar School era about a bricked-up room, there are two stories that seem to centre around this theme. One is that there is a bricked-up room where a crying baby can be heard, not depending on the source it is either in the Hall or it is in the tunnel under it. This sort of ties in with the story of a tunnel that goes beneath the Hall to the church which also has a rumour that black magic rituals/satanism occurred there. Rumour also has it that this was in the stables as a witness say blood on the floor, there was a smell of burning herbs and all seems to link back to a crying child. I found nothing about this for any solid proof along with no named witnesses.

There are mentions of maids/women who grab up a child, in some local stories it is her jumping from a third story window with the child as a release from the Lord, in others it is a maid that jumps from the cliff into the river.

VWGolf (nottsalgia) refers to one of the bricked-up rumours potentially being a more mundane explanation. In the hall is an Octagonal dining room, and a creative centre piece which he says was all on a column in the middle of the room. It had statues and reliefs and upon searching around I found some photographs of it, Clifton-Village.org.uk seems to have supporting photographs at least.

Anwar Rashid and his family got unwanted fame about the Hall, along with Lee Roberts from TAPIT who was not so shy of being involved. The profile-raising section of this story and the paranormal side of Clifton Hall seems to have become more entrenched in modern history with their side of the saga and this is something you will have to wait more to hear about…

Part two coming soon.

 

 

Sources:
Wikipedia                            savills.com                                          History of Nottinghamshire, Vol 1
Telegraph.co.uk                 mysteriousbritain.co.uk                 nottsalgia.com
Haunted rooms                 theparanormalguide.com            Clifton-vollage.org.uk
Paranormaldatabase.com            Dark Mansions – Dinah Williams
BBC News                           kids.kiddle.co                                    officialleeroberts.com
Google                                 Fortean Times                                   alchetron.com/chek-whyte
Paranormal Network      Find A Grave

Alright so this is off my usual planned topic but seems to be of local interest so here we are..

There have been several of the “sky trumpets” phenomenon reported world wide, the main bulk of this started around 2012 when there was a sense of apocalypse mania in some movements. The first one seems to have come from Kiev but this has continued to crop up, hoaxed or otherwise, on a semi-irregular basis. So today I spotted a few articles trending and thought it was worth a note or two.

To me they are often explainable, I have even experienced one set first hand but to be honest at 4am and not having thought to grab a phone it is entirely anecdotal but we worked out the source. I will first explain my experience, then I will go into the rest from there. Indulge me!

It was around a year before the internet started reporting those sky trumpets/odd noises and we were happily laying in bed. We didn’t really think about it in terms of aliens or anything biblical, we just woke up and it was VERY annoying. The room was floodlit and yet the only thing opposite is was another home and a pallid yellow street-light. We got up and headed outside having flung on some clothes, we looked around. Our street was nothing spectacular but at the end of it was a train track.

Many people who stumble across this post may relate to this, after a while you forget trains are there, the noise becomes nothing of note and you don’t even notice them. The train was huge! It was so loud and the lights were so bright it took a moment to register. We headed to bed and 15 minutes later all was well.

There are deliberate attempts to fake the noises that people talk about but there are also situations where the location of the noise is not apparent.

The BBC link an article here – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-40069751

The Express go for a far more sensational approach http://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/784772/End-of-world-apocalyptical-trumpet-noise-Nottingham

So what exactly is going on? Well to be honest… I doubt a lot. Nottingham has a lot of industry, commerce and not that far away an airport. Some comments online suggest it could be a local power plant and some the Boots factory (Boots are a large chemist company) might have been the cause. I really love a good story but detest the overly sensationalised hype that these tabloids throw out. There’s no need. Genuinely interested people will read a more reputable source.

I hope you enjoy the article and my little story but I don’t think I will be waiting for the Rapture, I’ll be sat here feeling sorry for hard working factory people in the current heat!

Ollerton, Nottinghamshire here in England has the ruins of a Cistercian Abbey, Rufford Abbey, and it is currently maintained by the English Heritage, the 1170ish abbey is one of the best preserved in England. In 1146 the Earl of Lincoln founded the abbey, St Mary the Virgin, and the monks wore undyed wool habits giving the nickname of “White Monks”. The monks there lived under the values of hard work and prayer from the completion around 1170 until it was suppressed in 1536.

From there on it became a family estate, remodelled and adapted to their needs accordingly and in 1952 it and its park were brought by Nottinghamshire Country Council, the north and east wings were then demolished in 1956. In the Edwardian times Vita Sackville West (authoress) stayed at the abbey as the guest to the owners of the time, the Saville’s awoke in the night feeling a clammy sensation. She mentioned the event to another of the guests and found out that others had been bothered by what they called a ‘Clammy Baby’, the ghost of a dead child trying to snuggle against women. These areas were demolished but now and then the stories crop up again.

One of the guides told a story about the sounds of a child having been heard in a ditch near an area known as Bride Road, she was surprised to hear from a couple of ladies who regularly walked their dogs and had heard the cries themselves. A psychic who visited also found herself drawn to that area, but had not been informed of a local story that a housemaid at the abbey drowned herself, and the baby, after an unwanted pregnancy.

I ventured out there as it was a nice day, packed the camera up and it took about 40 minutes drive to get there. I was immediately in love with the building, it has a grand look and to get to the building you walk up via the 19th Century stairs that had been added. I also loved that I got a few quiet moments to look around before a school trip descended. Underneath the exterior you can go into the underground chapel area and enjoy cooling down.

I didn’t really feel anything too spooky but there is a section with a model monk and table showing the foods of the time, I stood near him and felt a little spooked out. I suspect more to do with the model monk than anything else. I did venture towards the ditch but my attention was drawn to the animal graces, consequently the only ones there as the human remains were moved to the local church.

(Photography is my own)

https://silentthrill.wordpress.com/2012/10/21/newstead-sanitorium/ this is the main blog that started off my interest.

 

Newstead – further research

As some of my more regular readers, and those interested in Newstead. This may not prove to be entirely the most interesting thing some of you would read but I have placed it here as part of the further research I did after my initial posting. Whilst not creepy it is a follow up on the original information I found for the tuberculosis sanatorium in Newstead, Fishpool, Nottinghamshire.

I have researched into this as far as I feel I necessarily can given limited time-constraints and budgets/access to any further records.

The main reason many are likely to find it hard work to get more information other than passing reference or anecdotes is that there was never scandal or concern about the place in general. Nothing terrible happened, no one was murdered etc and so the press had no reason to cover anything that might lead to further documentation. For anyone who has been interested to find more I hope that the two blogs I have contributed are enough to give you an indication into the Newstead Sanatorium.

Originally it opened in 1942 but has since been demolished, it was opened in 1942 by the City of Nottingham as a TB sanatorium (notation via Philip E Jones, Turning back the pages in Ravenshead). The building had shallowly-projecting balconies along the south front and a two-storey, flat-roofed north wing that housed service and administration functions.

In 1994 the area was given planning permission for a residential value of £10 million. From 1942 to 1964 there were 900 child patients that attended the school over that 22 year period. It was closed in 1964 and became a Geriatric hospital until 1992, it was then closed and finally demolished.

THE LONDON GAZETTE, 28TH AUGUST 1996 – Public Notices

AGAS DEVELOPMENTS LTD. Notice of Application for Public Gas Transporters Licence Extension Notice is hereby given that AGAS Developments Limited has applied for a licence extension from the Director General of Gas Supply to its public gas transporters licence treated as granted under section 7 of the Gas Act 1986 in respect of the following areas:

Newstead Hospital, Ravenshead, OS Ref. SK 54 55 Nottinghamshire

Daily Life and information:

TB was treated with penicillin which did not cure the disease but was able to ease the symptoms for some, a patient that was there in 1961 stated that the patients would smoke, when the doctors were due on rounds the nurses would rush around to help them hide the smell to avoid them getting in trouble.

The beds were on an open veranda and would have only blinds to shield the patients from the cold British weather. Another former patient that has helped me, has explained that often the windows were left open no matter the time of year. Due to the windows and balconies being left open it was not unusual for patients to find snow on their beds during the bad weather.

Another anecdote I found is that the patients would have spare clothes, or they would have people bring some in for them so that they could go into Mansfield at night, they would do this by catching a local bus and then go to the pub.

This was the case for a similar place, Woodland in Shropshire where the buildings were left open and unused afterwards because people worried about going in and there being a chance of infection. In the case of Woodland the main area is now part of an Industrial Estate but there are still some who are superstitious about the use of the area and about entering it. This may have contributed as to why these buildings have, in many cases, been left in disrepair or have been demolished.

T A Newham was a patient there in 1960 on Ward 6 and notes that one of the first wards to close was the children’s. They were separate to the main building and the responder states that there were 6 wards on three floors. He said that the genders were not meant to mix but then he intimates that it happened anyway.

Doreen Towle said that her mother was there from 1962, she never heard a bad word about it and her mother used to enjoy the daily bottle of stout. She did remember it being a lengthy bus journey when she was only 15. She now lives in Australia at the time of writing this post.

I found another extract and this is from A Call to Arms by Edmund Stawow, a personal account of their time in service. The bit I looked at was for the purposes of this recent look at the Sanatorium. He describes the Sanatorium as a large four-story brick building that is in the forest around the gently rising hills. The air was considered to be pure and the place tranquil which supported the idea at the time of respite and fresh air for the symptoms and to try and cure TB. The account is more about visiting a friend but within that does mention that they had visiting hours.

17th March 1943 from what I can make out there was a letter from Mrs Johnson and family thanking the doctors and staff for beautiful floral tributes and thank you to the staff at No 3 Ward, Isolation.

Some of those associated as patients or workers:

Lilian RODE daughter of Benjamin Rofe and Martha Annie Lowe, born in 1900. She was born in Burslem, Staffordshire and worked at Newstead Sanatorium, Nottingham.

The British Journal Of Nursing – April 1944. APPOINTMENTS. – MATRON. Newstead Sanatorium, Nottingham. – Miss Hilda I. Richards, S.R.N., S.C.M., has been appointed Matron. She was trained at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital; at the David Lewis Northern Hospital, Liverpool ; and at the City of London Maternity Hospital. Miss Richards has been Ward Sister at the David Lewis Northern Hospital, Liverpool; Night Sister, Home and Stores Sister, and Assistant Matron at the City Sanatorium, Birmingham. She also took the Housekeeping Course of the Leicester Royal Infirmary; and holds Honours of the Tuberculosis Association.

James RUSSELL, son of James RUSSELL (1869-1945) and Kate MASON (1871-1941), was born on 19 August 1903 in Lenton, Nottingham. He appeared in the census on 2 April 1911 in 12 Jackson Terrace, Simkin Street, Nottingham aged 7. He was a Lorry Driver. He died of Bronchial Carcinoma, Chronic Bronchitis and Auricular Fibrillation on 29 July 1965 in Newstead Hospital, Nottinghamshire aged 61. He was cremated on 4 August 1965 in Wilford Crematorium aged 61. Lily and James had 9 children listed.

Lily RUSSELL daughter of James RUSSELL and Lily PHILLIPSON, was born on 19 February 1931 in St. Anns. She died of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Tuberculous Laryngitis on 16 February 1946 in Newstead Sanatorium, Nottinghamshire. She was buried in Wilford Hill Cemetery, Nottingham aged 15.

MRS D. J. FLEMING : Obituary Published in the Chad.co.uk on 15 October 2011

A service at Mansfield crematorium chapel preceded cremation of Mrs Dorothy Joyce Fleming (80), who had been a resident of Wren Hall Nursing Home, Selston. Mrs Fleming had previously lived at Kirkby. Born at Birmingham and educated at School Street and Vernon Road schools, Kirkby, Mrs Fleming had been a local resident for 78 years.

Before her marriage she was a nurse at Newstead Sanatorium, then she had been a cook supervisor at Jeffries Primary School for many years until retiring. Her interests included collecting china, visits to the Potteries, holidays, watching musicals, ballet and ice skating, listening to classical music. She especially loved being with her children and grandchildren.

Mrs Fleming, who died at Wren Hall Nursing Home, leaves her daughters, Susan Cross and Sandra Playford, five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. She was pre-deceased by her husband, Mr Kenneth Fleming. Mourners Mr T. Playford, Mrs S. Playford, Mrs S. Cross, Miss E. Cross, Mrs R. Mason,MrR. J. Playford, Mr and Mrs G. Lynk, Mr P. Stafford, Mr S. Lynk, Mrs J. Lynk, Mr N. Mason, Ms M. Gent, Mrs P. Hayes, Mr and Mrs C. Wilson, Mr and Mrs G. W. Cooper, Mrs P. Severn; Mrs S. A. Walsh (representing Walsh family), Mrs C. Morris, Mr T. Cross, Mr C. Fowler, Mrs M. Walters, Mrs L. Wheat, Mrs D. Lee, Mrs E. Clarke, Mrs B. Hinchliffe, Mrs L. Walton, Mrs M. Poyser. Representing Wren Hall Nursing Home were Mrs S. Powell, Mrs K. Clay, Mrs P. Haney, Mrs J. Scothern, Mrs K. Ormshaw. Floral tributes were from the family and all at Wren Hall.

Donations received in lieu were for the Residents’ Fund at Wren Hall. The service was conducted by the Rev M. Evans, and arrangements were by K. Gregory&Sons Ltd.

Mrs Helga Irmgard Kijan (79), who died at her home at Ladybrook Lane, Mansfield, was cremated at Mansfield after a service at the crematorium chapel. Born at Danzig, Germany, Mrs Kijan was educated there until the age of 15, when she went to study English and shorthand and typing at college in Berlin. She came to England in 1948 when the English were advertising for workers and had lived locally for 60 years. Mrs Kijan worked for two years as a nurse at Newstead Sanatorium until 1950 and after her marriage and the birth of her children worked at Lawn Mills on Rosemary Street, at Seal & Turner’s, and finally at Mansfield Hosiery Mills from where she retired in 1986. Her interests were very family orientated and she also enjoyed poetry, music — from classic and jazz to easy listening — reading, current affairs and watching television, especially documentaries, soaps and sporting events.

She also loved being with her Dachshund, Danny. Mrs Kijan leaves her husband, Mr Wasyl Anton Kijan, son André, daughter Roma, four grandchildren, Jason, Rachel, Daniella and Ashley, and three great-grandchildren, Alexandra, Bailey and Riley.

Mourners were Mr W. Kijan, Mr and Mrs A. Kijan, Mr and Mrs John Redfern, Mr and Mrs Jason Redfern, Miss R. Redfern, Mr A. Kijan and Miss S. Dykes, Miss D. Kijan, Mr and Mrs J. and D. Hales, Mr K. Boxford, Mrs A. Boxford, Mr D. Boxford, Mr D. Woodhead, Mrs L. Sykelyk, Mr and Mrs D. Palmer, Mr and Mrs G. Champion, Mrs A. Gill, Mr and Mrs I. Blythe, Mrs J. S. Redfern, Mr and Mrs T. J. Redfern, Mrs A. Shaw, Ms J. Draper, Mr and Mrs A. Galazyka, Mr S. Kocun, Mr and Mrs K. A. Hurt, Mr V. Lutak.

The service was conducted by Mr D. Sharpe, and arrangements were by Co-operative Funeralcare.

MR A. HUNT (Forest Town) – Published in the Chad, 10th February 2010.

Former steam engine driver Mr Arthur Hunt (92), of Woodland Road, Forest Town, was cremated at Mansfield after a service at the crematorium chapel. Born at Stanley Common, Derbyshire and educated at Carter Lane and High Oakham Boys’ schools, Mansfield, Mr Hunt lived locally for most of his life. For 33 years he was a steam engine driver, after which he worked for 11 years self-employed in a hardware store. Latterly, he worked for seven years at Newstead Hospital as a boiler man, from where he retired in 1991. Mr Hunt loved family get-togethers, driving and walking in Derbyshire, DIY at home, steam railway trips, reading, dancing, holidays and his garden.

Mr Hunt, who died at King’s Mill Hospital, Sutton, leaves his partner of 30 years, Mrs Shirley A. Scarborough, two daughters, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren and Shirley’s family — one son, three daughters, five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Mourners were Mrs S. Scarborough, Mr J. Barker, Mr and Mrs R. Baggaley, Miss C. Baggaley, Mr R. Baggaley, Mrs J. Wright, Miss J. Scarborough, Mr M. Wright, Miss K. Stanley, Mr J. Barker, Miss H.Martin, Mr and Mrs M. Dennison, Mr and Mrs M. Smedley, Mrs S. Thorpe, Miss Z. Thorpe, Miss J. Thorpe, Mr and Mrs D. Kennedy, Miss S. Kennedy, Mr A. Kennedy, Mrs D. See, Mr and Mrs G.Kennedy, Mrs P. Davey, Mr and Mrs J. Kelsall, Mr C. Kelsall, Mrs E. Herkowyj, Mr and Mrs P. Holland, Mr M.Hawkins, Mr and Mrs A. Chappell, Mr J. Hayden, Mr and Mrs D. Daykin.

Representing 50 Plus Oak Tree Centre were Mr and Mrs J. Ellis, Mr and Mrs A. Eames, Mr R. Taylor, Mrs S. Watson, Mrs M. Butlin, Mr and Mrs G. Butler, Mr R. Richards.

Forest Town WI representatives included Mrs E. Pinnick and Mrs R. Downing.

Maun Motors representatives were Mr D. MacCallam and Mr L. Hallam, and Age Concern at Mansfield, was represented by Mrs M. Sharpe and Mrs A. Morgan.

Floral tributes were from Shirley, Jean and Mick, Barbara and Derick; Ken and Kath, brother and family in Australia; James, Heather, Paige and Lucas, Claire and Richard, Mark and Kirsty, Suzanne, Michael, William, Eleanor and Angelica; Dawn, Sue, Zoey, Jade, Andrew Sarah; Mrs Norma Barker.
Donations received in lieu of flowers were for the British Heart Foundation.

The service was conducted by the Rev R. Jones, and arrangements were by Sutton Co-operative Funeralcare.

http://www.unwritten.org.uk

I found an article here about a nurse during the war and who was stationed at Newstead. Megan Jenkins was a nurse who explained it was that or the forces, so she picked nursing. Before her arrival to the hospital she was engaged to an American from the forces who died in D-Day, she ended up with a post at Sully Hospital (Mid Glamorgan, now converted into luxury apartments) where the treatment was like many, fresh air for TB and if they had to treat it surgically a rib was removed and then the lung was collapsed, after rest the disease would die and hopefully the patient would recover.

The pay as a nurse was not great and so she had looked around for a better job, she found an advertisement in The Nursing Mirror, “Newstead Sanatorium, sister wanted.” And and she went to get an interview, she was there on a Friday 13th for the male ward and she became a sister there.

Sister Jenkins fell in love with an RAF officer there, she used to take the patient’s pillows out for complete rest for an hour, and there was the tall, good looking man. Each month the nurses would be screen for TB and the matron must have picked up on the secret affair, she was reminded that they were patients and infectious! So she was told to get out.

I think her for her candid report about that and the other things in her life, which I haven’t gone into as they not relevant to this particular subject.

MARGARET SIPSON (nee Horrobin) – Born 1931, wanted to be a nurse from an early age and realised she had to wait until she was 18 to train to be a State Registered Nurse. When she was 17 she was able to train as TB Nurse and work at Newstead Sanatorium, when she reached 18 she went off to Sheffield Royal Infirmary to do her full training. She came back to Newstead as a staff nurse, and was soon promoted to ward sister on the children’s ward.

Anthony G. Hancock Wollaton – He had been reading about the Sanatorium in a news article from the Nottingham Post and responded to explain his mother had been a TB patient there, she was 38 and spent 13 months in Newstead. Whatever the weather was like the doors were open and she had told him that she remembered only a couple of times when they were not, this had been due to fog and this was not considered good for the lungs. As a nine year old boy he was unable to visit her so had to wave at her from the field at the rear.

He mentioned that his mother was taken to the Ransom one in Nottingham for two other operations, they were brutal but saved her life from TB and then when Streptomycin came in she recovered for good, she lived until 81 years of age.

Lance Corporal William Pritchard (90 years of age in 2013) was also featured in the Nottingham Post, he was part of the Home Guard, they had orders to capture a German pilot who had crashed his fighter plane in Bramcote Hills. They went over with very little protection and from the crashed plane came the pilot who drew his pistol, they feared the worst but he threw it away and handed himself over.

The Home Guard then took him to the awaiting army lorry and he was taken in as a prisoner, as this was happening the phone rang and the prisoner ran, out through the open door into the dark night, they followed him until they heard a splash and found him in icy water where they finally had him taken away.

Unfortunately William did not make it into the picture of the home guard there, he was ill at the time, he then joined an anti-aircraft battery stationed at Wilford Hill, he did some training at Sutton-On-Sea and said that they even had run and made quite a few friends. His attempt to join the army for the war effort did not happen, he was rejected for being knock-kneed and could not stand to attention.

Not one to ignore the call he instead tried to go into the RAF, William was initially accepted but then later he was told he could not go because he was medically unfit. William ended up in Newstead Sanatorium for four years and lost his left lung to the disease.

At the time I found this Lance Corporal William Pritchard was helping with the Salvation Army.

Detection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis by Means of Fluorescence Microscopy
Tubercle, Volume 28, Issue 9, Pages 189-192.

G.O.A. Briggs, Maxwell H. Jennison

(link http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041387948800346)

I found some short reference to the above journal and apologise, but as this is not towards some form of actual book and more a passion of investigation, I did not pay for full access. The extract I found seems to compare two forms of technique for identifying the TB Bacteria.

For those of you wanting a quick explanation: Ziehl–Neelsen stain is acid fast staining, and Mycobacteria is what is known as an acid-fast. Mycobacteria tuberculosis was identified by Robert Koch in 1882 and the Zhiel-Neelsen test is the most commonly used way to test for this outside of a tb skin test or chest radiographs (introduced later from what I could find).

In comparison to this was Fluorescence Microscopy which used the an optical microscope that uses either fluorescence or phosphorescence to identify the properties of organic and inorganic substances. (incidentally it makes for some lovely viewing on an aesthetic level).

The document seems to be referring to a recently published article about the tests of these written by the above authors in November, 1948 from Newstead Sanatorium. The overall summary from the first page I read seems to suggest that the acid fast test proved to be more to their favour.

In effect from what I deduce (I may be wrong!) is that they had used patients at Newstead to form a comparison basis in regards to identifying TB at the time. This seems plausible given that a steadfast method for identifying the illness for treatment would be important as well.

British Medical Journal – Sept 11, 1948.

A statement from the Ministry of Health is about the streptomycin treatment for TB patients, the beds are listed in numbers for each hospital and explains that they must be fully staffed for the scientific control of the treatment. It describes the need to understand the drug given that it is most likely going to be used more and more. The initial plan for randomised treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis seems to list Newstead Sanatorium with 4 available staffed beds for the trial.

Nottingham Evening Post information I could find:

20th August 1941 – Maintenance engineer required to take charge of the plant at Newstead, approaching it’s completion. Salary £4/10 per week.

23rd October 1941/ Boiler house attendants required, there are no residences on the site and the pay is 1/6 per hour.

31st January 1942 – Space for a cook at the sanatorium with a list of 180 beds to cover, the pay is £150 per annum with a war bonus.

6th May 1942 – The New Modern Sanatorium with 180 beds is near its completion and so they are inviting student nurses age 17+ to apply.Daily women needed for cleaning new hospital, also a woman to help with plain sewing. Apply to Matron.

8th May 1942/ 15th May 1942 – A Steward, over military age, or otherwise exempt from military service, is required for the above institution.

29th May 1942/30th May 1942/ 3rd June 1942/ 10th July 1942/13th July 1942 – The New Modern Sanatorium with 180 beds is near its completion and so they are inviting student nurses age 17+ to apply.

11th July 1942 – New Sanatorium, near completion. Salary for the first year is £40. (unable to determine the position from what I could find)

19th August 1942 – Health Committee Require the JL services of a Registered Dentist at the Sanatorium.

22nd August 1942 – House or bungalow is wanted for immediate rent within 5 miles of the sanatorium.

26th August 1942 /27th August 1942/28th August 1942 – Assistant cook is being asked for, previous hospital experience is necessary. Salary £75 rising by £5 to £85 plus war bonus with full board, uniform and laundry. Applying to the Matron, Fishpool, Mansfield, Notts.

29th August 1942/ 1st September 1942 – Staff Nurses are needed and says ‘Salary of Staff Nurses (S.R.N. and T.A.) £90 rising by £5 to £110 plus war bonus and usual emoluments).

17th December 1942/ 18th December 1942 – A Porter for general duties, wages 60 a week, plus war bonus. Applications, with copies of two testimonial could be sent to the medical superintendent.

21st Jan 1943/23rd Jan 1943 – Assistant cook is being asked for, they ask for someone with experience in numbers. Wages offered are £75 + 5—£85’s per annum and War Bonus, use of uniform. Here is it listed as Kirkby Road, Fishpool, Nr Mansfield.

Boiler attendant being asked for.

4th February 1943 – Nurses from 17 years old + required, Salary first year I didn’t quite get but for the second year it’s £50 and usual emolument. Apply to the Matron at the sanatorium, Kirkby Road.

14th May 1943 – Cooked required and a canteen assistant. Wages offered are £75, rising annually by £5 to £85 for the cook.

15th May 1943 – Assistant cook is being asked for, they ask for someone with experience in numbers. Wages offered are £75 + 5—£85’s per annum and War Bonus, use of uniform. Here is it listed as Kirkby Road, Fishpool, Nr Mansfield.

17th May 1943 – £45 first year, second year it’s £50, use of uniform.

18th May 1943 /20th May 1943/ 21st May 1943 – Nurses from 17 years old + required, £45 first year, second year it’s £50 and usual emolument. Use of Uniform. Application forms and particulars from the matron.

22nd May 1943 – Nurses from 17 years old + required, £45 first year, second year it’s £50 and usual emolument. Use of Uniform. Apply to the Matron at the sanatorium, Kirkby Road.

28th May 1943 – Carpenter instructor required, need to apply with their qualifications for either part time or full time work.

4th June 1943 – Carpenter Instructor required for Newstead Sanatorium, near Nottingham. Applicants should give qualifications and salary required for full or part-time work.

26th July 1943/27th July 1943 – Cook is being asked for, they ask for someone with experience in numbers. Wages offered are £75, rising annually by £5 to £85.

28th August 1943/ 30th August 1943 – Silver nurses badge inscribed with I M Baxter S.R.N lost between the bus station at the sanatorium and the city. A reward offered if was found.

4th September 1943 Cook Required, experience with numbers preferred. Salary £100 per annum, rising £5 annually £115 and War Bonus.

7th September 1943 – Urgently requiring cook, Salary £100 rising £5 annually to £110 with war bonus.

18th September 1943/20th September 1943 – Porter required for general duties, £4/1/6 per week, copies of two testimonials to be provided with application to the Medical Superintendent.

13th Jan 1944/15th Jan 1944 – Urgently requiring cook, Salary £100 rising £5 annually to £110 with war bonus.

1st February 1944/2nd February 1944 – Space for a cook at the sanatorium with a list of 180 beds to cover, the pay is £150 per annum with a war bonus.

3rd Feb 1944 – they are looking for cleaners, 44 hours per work and applications to be addressed to Matron (Miss Berkley) at Newstead Sanatorium, Nr Fishpool, Mansfield.

8th Feb 1944 / 9th February 1944/ 10th February 1944 – Space for a cook at the sanatorium with a list of 180 beds to cover, the pay is £150 per annum with a war bonus.

8th March 1944 – R Clayton asking for a large set of table skittles at the sanatorium, asks to write to him with the price.

22nd June 1944 – A porter is required for general duties, wages £4/3/6. They are asked to provide two testimonials to the Superintendent.

7th February 1944 – Non-resident Teacher at the City of Nottingham Sanatorium, which is situated near Newstead Park, Nottinghamshire. There are twelve children at present at the Sanatorium, all non-infectious cases, and instruction is required in English.

8th November 1945 – Ambulance driver, wages £3.14 per week.

10th November 1945/28th November – Female ward orderlies required, 48 hour week. £3.6 per hour riding by .2 annually. Includes war bonus. Apply with testimonials to the matron.

30th November 1945 – Female ward orderlies required, 48 hour week. £3.6 per hour riding by .2 annually. Includes war bonus. Apply with testimonials to the matron.

7th December 1945/10th December 1945 – Woman and girls wanted, resident or non resident for work in the nurses home.

11th January 1946 – Female orderlies required for children’s ward, 48 hour week.

8th March 1946 – Window Cleaner needed, being able to drive an advantage.

9th March 1946 – advertisement for student nurses, from 17 years upwards.

15th March 1946 – Male Hairdressers needed for two half-days per week.

8th June 1946 -Resident kitchen and dining room maids needed immediate. 48 hour week and uniform.

5th October 1946 /9th October 1946 – Applications are being taken for the post of a short-hand typist. It says something about salary in accordance with the General Division of the National Joint Council.

10th October 1946 – Male ward orderly Required, R.A.M.C. experience an advantage; 48-hour week, wages £4/19/* per week (including War Bonus) Apply with full particulars to the Matron.

22nd November 1946 – hairdresser needed for 210 bed sanatorium.

19th May 1947/9th June 1947 – General porter needed, wage and conditions accordingly, asked to provide two recent testimonials and to send to the Medical Superintendent.

20th February 1948 /26th February 1948 – Training school applications for appointment for student nurses (male and female) for 236 bed hospital.

23rd March 1948/10th December 1948 – Male ward orderlies needed. RAMO experience an advantage.

29th March 1948/16th November 1948/26th November 1948 – Affiliated Training school applications are being invited for the 236 bed hospital for Sanatorium training. 18 years or over.

20th August 1948 – Training school applications for appointment for student nurses (male and female) for 236 bed hospital.

29th October 1948 – Staff nurses needed.

26th August 1949/2nd September 1949/16th September 1949 – 256 bed hospital. Training school applications for appointment for student nurses (male and female)

23rd September 1949 – Looking for an assistant head cook.

30th September 1949 – Assistant Head Cook applications are being taken, male candidates.

4th November 1949 – Ward Orderlies are needed with them giving preference to applicants that had been in the RAM.

30th December 1949/31st December 1949 – Applications are being taken for the post of a short-hand typist.

6th Feb 1950/16th November 1950 – Mentioned to have 236 beds and being affiliated with Sheffield Royal Infirmary

27th March 1950 – Radiographer is required, with the salary for a Senior Radiographer or Radiographer depending on their experience, it says the Sanatorium is modern in it too.

28th March 1950 – Looking for a female cook.

4th May 1950 – I tried to find more but all I got was an obituary of someone that died there (name I could not get) for someone who died after a long illness – In silence she suffered. In patience she bore till God called her Home to suffer no more.

17th May 1950 – looking for two kitchen assistants.

Further information found in the Nottingham Archives.

This information comes from Quinquennial Report Upon the work of the Sheffield Regional Hospital Board from 1947 to 1952 and Quinquennial Report Upon the work of the Sheffield Regional Hospital Board from 1952 to 1957.

In 1911 it was made obligatory by the Tuberculosis Regulations to inform the Medical Officer of Health about any cases of pulmonary TB, it was part of the beginning of an organised scheme and was part of the services that came under the newly formed NHS. It was seen as necessary to create a way to administer the service through the (then) 17 local authorities.

Chest Clinics were part of those services, meaning that they would act as a place for:

  1. reception, diagnoses, observation and treatment;

  2. the examination of contacts;

  3. after-care of patients treated.

It was determined that beds for this purpose were still needed in areas, particularly Nottinghamshire but in 1952 it was less urgent than in 1948. An appendix table in the medical records for the area show that the number of open beds for admission in regards to respiratory cases (including TB) went from 449 in Nottingham, 5th July 1948 to 529 on 31st December 1952. They had reopened 26 beds and had added an additional 54.

In regards to Nottingham there were the following:

Respiratory cases admitted by year: 778 in 1949; 799 in 1950; 775 in 1951 and 760 in 1952.

Non-Respiratory cases: 121 in 1949; 107 in 1950, 104 in 1951 and 141 in 1952.

It details the differences in male, female and child admissions overall but did not break it down for Nottingham, I have not included those figures for this purpose.

It is mentioned that the major centres to be established in the region directly for Nottingham would be, City Hospital and Ransom Sanatorium (tuberculosis only in the latter), it does not mention the use of Newstead. During this period the Regional Hospital Board was Sheffield.

1953 – there was a noted improvement in incidence rates of tuberculosis, and in mortality, as opposed to the beginning of the century. The main attributing factor is that of the introduction of the use of antibiotics, directly referencing Streptomycin. The main people now affected are considered to be that of young women and elderly men. The drug had cheapened since it was first introduced. A course of the treatment was listed as approximately one pound per month, the other two drugs listed were Terramycin and Viomycin, which in contrast were costing around forty-pounds per month.

This has significantly affected the number of required beds in the wards and so there is now a direct listing for Newstead, Nottingham as having 26 beds (1 ward) for children-orthopaedic use. This is in stark contract to the previous list of 529 the year before being listed overall as possible TB recovery beds.

1963 I found a record that Newstead has a listed 65 beds for the chronic sick, now being used as beds for non-tuberculosis use given the decrease in TB cases overall.

Further Reading/Links for reference:

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Level

Collection

Repository

GB 0157 Nottinghamshire Archives

ReferenceNo

SCH/118/1

FullCatalogue

View collection catalogue

AccessionNo

7245

Title

NEWSTEAD HOSPITAL SCHOOL

Date

1944 – 1964

Extent

2 vols

CreatorName

Newstead: Hospital School

AdminHistory

(attached to Newstead sanatorium) Opened 3 April 1944; clsoed 1964 and the children transferred to Harlow Wood Hospital School.

ScopeAndContent

Log book and admission register

AccessStatus

Restricted Access

AccessConditions

CARN reader’s ticket required

AccessCategoryNote

Some of these records are on restricted access for 100 years; access dates are noted beside the relevant document. If access to any restricted record is required please apply to the Team Managers Archives and Local Studies.

ReproductionNote

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 City Hospital Annual Report 1944