Posts Tagged ‘WW2’

March 31st, 1922 left the world with a set of six unsolved murders in the farmstead known as Hinterkaifeck, whilst that is not it’s official name due to the location that is how it has become better known. This makes for an interesting read for armchair detective enthusiasts.

A few days before the crime occurred farmer, Andreas Gruber, had told neighbours he had found footprints leading up to the farm but none leading away again. The house keys had gone missing several days beforehand and despite hearing footsteps in the attic for some reason he did not report the events to the police.

6 months before the event a former maid had left, she had claimed that the farmstead was haunted. The new maid, Maria Baumgartner, arrived a few hours before the event. The bodies of the family and maid were then found on the 4th April after no one from the house had been spotted for several days. Cäzilla had not shown up for school and the post had been left untouched.

An investigation was launched and they believe that somehow the older couple, then daughter Viktoria and her daughter Cäzilla were lured out into the barn one by one and killed. Two year old Josef was killed as he slept in his cot in his mother’s room. The maid was killed in her bed chamber and that left no one alive from the family unit on the farmstead.

An aspect called into question about this is what might have happened to Viktoria’s husband, Karl Gabriel as he had been reported as killed in the French Trenches in 1914. His body had not been recovered leading some to suggest that it might have been a false report.

The victims memorial can be found at Waidhofen but their skulls are not there, they were lost because they were not returned from Munich, during the chaos of World War 2 they were lost after being sent there for further analysis. Apparently Clairvoyants were also allowed to look at them in the hopes of more clues. That they did find from Cäzilla’s autopsy is that she lay there for several hours dying next to her grandparents and her mother. The distress had led her to pulling out tufts of her own hair.

The farmstead itself was demolished in 1923. The mystery remains…

 

The nuclear bomb images from Hiroshima and Nagasaki are in my mind some of the most poignant moments of history captured. It is not secret to people that know me I am an avid hater of modern warfare outside of the TV screens and books.

My grandfather died of war wounds when my mother was thirteen and no doubt anyone else with connections to serving men and women will know the fear that comes with their campaigns away. So with that in mind I hope I don’t seem to be sensationalising it all with this post.

If any places on the planet were likely to be haunted I would put my last dollar/pound on these two places. No surprise then that there have been reports of voices with pleads and cries from around the area around twilight.

USAF Storage Haunts – Okinawa in Japan, the whole island there is said to be haunted from the WW2 era as well. It is said that one of these areas is the Munitions Storage on Kadena AB, along one of the main roads there is a clearing used for fishing at the lake. It is said that sometimes people are sat there at night and hear noises like feet stomping the ground. There have been reports that a battalion of Japanese soldiers have been seen walking across the lake, who then disappear suddenly.

Yokosuka Naval Base, Gridley Tunnel is a narrow, one way tunnel that runs through a hill from Gridley Lane to Nimitz Boulevard. There are reports from people driving through the tunnel that they have seen a man dressed as a samurai, the reports bear similarity for the most part.

People report that as they are driving through they look in their rear view mirror to see a man dressed as a Samurai, he stands in the middle of the road where there was no one before. Some people have been startled enough to ram into the side of the tunnel.

Legend has it that the samurai was on the way to avenge the death of his lord but was ambushed at the tunnel and cut down. Because he had failed in his mission he cannot leave his place of death. I can’t help but think if that is the way of the Samurai that there should be an abundance of these sightings all over Japan… not every Samurai was Rurouni Kenshin after all!

Warning – fairly lengthy post for me!

London was and remains a large scale part of English history, past and future. During the pre-Victorian and through the Victorian period finding a place to bury the dead was no easy task. London’s capital for instance had doubled in a short space, with it came the dead and more need to inter them.

Finding a cemetery that could be used for the purpose could be just as difficult as picking a first home. Cemetery space was at a prime, people needed the space and bodies were left in terrible states around the capital city. Regularly graves were desecrated and re-used, disinterred bones were left scattered across grounds. It wasn’t just cemeteries either but the results of this terrible lack of organisation meant that there was a great deal of risk for disease with the material from decomposing bodies entering drinking wells and springs.

1848-1849 saw a cholera outbreak that killed nearly 15,000 Londoners and made it very obvious that there was a drastic need to sort the situation out. A brilliant description of some of the problems was documented by G A Walker in his Gatherings from Graveyards, I have been very lucky to obtain a copy and if I get chance will scan some pages in at later date.

In 1849 Sir Richard Broun came up with an answer, he proposed buying a large area of land to build a massive cemetery. The 2,000 acre plot would be his Necropolis and at a distance of 25 miles from London posed little to no risk of seeing the same issue arise. He proposed that the railway line from Waterloo to Southampton could offer a way to transport coffins and mourners alike…

The idea of a railway link to rural cemeteries had been thought about before he presented his ideas but not everyone seemed convinced, the clamour and bustle of a train would detract from the dignified Christian funeral. Also would it not be somewhat offensive to have a body in a coffin on a train where the family and friends were already suffering, and then treat like some form of conveyor  belt affair?

The idea of rail travel was still a new thing anyway, but Waterloo line was completed 1848 and the first Necropolis Station came along six years after that. In June 1852 an Act of Parliament was passed which created The London Necropolis and National Mausoleum Company, it was later shortened to The London Necropolis Company. London & South Western Railway were the partner’s and they estimated £40,000 a year from it. It was decided however that the trains used would have to be a separate service, it was not a good idea to put a funeral party near mainstream passenger services and potentially drive away both.

There was another concern about how the varying religions and classes would be addressed using the service and so there were two stations. One served the conformist area on the sunny south side and the other served the non-conformists on the chilly north side. The class tickets also came into play, the dead were also split into the classes too.

Brookwood Cemetery grounds were consecrated 7th November 1854, six days later the world’s first funeral train was ready to go. The York Street terminus was restricting its passenger services, and if the company was going to expand it needed Waterloo and to demolish York Street terminus. A long period of negotiations went on and the London Necropolis was persuaded to give up it’s York Street post for a replacement 999-year lease, low rent and compensation along with a new supply train with return tickets for the mourners to use on the SWR more expensive trains at their own low cost.

The Act of Parliament meant the tickets prices for the Funerary side were fixed until 1939, Golfer’s going to nearby West Hill Golf Club would take advantage by dressing up as mourners. The remains of a rough footpath are still seen at the cemetery, it’s suggested the cheapskate golfers caused it. So far the history of the Funeral Rail service looked promising however in October 1900 the Necropolis Railway dropped Sunday services from it’s timetable and the trains went into decline until they ran once or twice a week. Finally the new motor hearse posed a new threat but this did not cause the end of its days, the German Luftwaffe did.

Bombs, April 16th 1941 was one of the worst nights of the London Blitz. The Necropolis train was berthed and did not escape, the area was levelled and only the platforms remained. It would have been too expensive it replace it and although the Necropolis Service ended in 1941 there is some evidence coffins were conveyed to Brookwood by rail into the 1950’s.

3rd march 1943, and the air raid siren started up and the local population made the run to their local tube station. That night they had also decided to test-fire an experimental rocket in nearby Victoria Park. the explosion prompted an already nervous crowd into panic.

A woman fell on the stairs, taking several people with her which prompted the crowd into panic. It was a terrible tragedy and due to the morale of London at the time many of the facts remained undisclosed until 1946.

173 men, women and children were crushed to death. It was another awful tragedy for many families.

Why have I picked this? Well a report from 1981 and onwards started to suggest that the area is still active, with late night staff hearing screams that could be heard for up to fifteen minutes. It sounds like a residual type of haunting, with the imprint of the disaster forever remembered in the walls of the tube station.

Disaster Memorial Page

From the Paranormal Database 

Cries and Screams

Location: E2 – Bethnal Green Station
Type: Haunting Manifestation
Date / Time: 1981
Further Comments: A station master working alone in the station office late at night heard the soft sounds of children crying. As time went by, the cries grew louder and were joined by the screams of women. He ran from the office. One hundred and seventy-three people died in the station in a single accident during World War 2, the vast majority being women and children.