Posts Tagged ‘WWII’

Like many asylums this Australian institute is reportedly haunted and as of 1999 its closure has brought paranormal adventurers to the sight. It was part of a larger complex known as Mont Park, it had 750 patients at its peak and has housed some of the most mentally ill criminals in Australia.

It was the first treatment centre for Peter Dupras, a serial killer with rape and false imprisonment included in his history. It is also the birthplace of Lithium, used in the treatment of the manic episode of those suffering bi-oplar.

The asylums construction started in 1938 but WWII disrupted it, it formerly opened it’s doors in 1953. The asylum grounds now have 550 residential dwellings and the last remaining wards are due to be redeveloped.

As for ghostly goings on? Expect the usual of banging, children’s laughter and crying. One rumour of a child on the third floor of a building playing a music box kept turning up in my searches. The creepy sounds and music may well be from the local university who intend its use to scare away trespassers. As with all of these glorious old places I can see why, vandalism and graffiti disturb me more than ghosts, because ghosts down show a blatant disregard for property and history.

Atlas Obscura Entry

Wikipedia Entry 

Mont Park.jpg
By MelburnianOwn work (Digital photograph by author), CC BY 2.5, Link

Also known as The Island of the Dead, it is run by the NYC Department of corrections and to visit you’d need to be either a convict, worker or a family member of someone that is buried on the island, and even family members are heavily supervised. Tresspass also leaves violators with a heavy fine and up to two years of imprisonment.

Hart’s Island was a POW camp for four months during 1865, 235 confederate soldiers died on the island. In 1870 it was a yellow fever quarantine station for New York and then in 1885 there was a women’s insane asylum which still stands today, and there was also a boys reformatory. Then in World War 2 it was handed to the Navy and it has also been used as a prison, TB Sanatorium and drug rehabilitation centre.

So all of this aside the Island has also been used for another purpose, the disposal of the dead for those that cannot be funded for a proper burial. 850,000 people have been buried there in mass graves and the number is not likely to stop.

Most of the people that are buried there died as unknown, unclaimed bodies. The homeless, mentally ill, alcoholics, transients, and other unfortunates from the minors to elders reside in the trenches and with such a gloomy history it’s not surprising that stories of the haunted come from the land.

A trench at the potter's field on Hart Island, circa 1890 by Jacob Riis

Built in 1930’s it is situated at Netheravon Road, Changi Villages, Singapore. It’s design is typical of the buildings from the British Colonial architects in the 1920’s. During the assault of the Japanese aggression from Malaya in February 1942 Changi was one of the first attack points.

In a day or two later it was occupied by the Japanese army, soon after OCH was converted into a military hospital, after the occupation ended it was converted back and later had a military ward on the 3rd level.

February 1997, it was replaced with the new hospital, it was isolated and left vacant. Stories about the building being haunted started in 1940’s, with 70+ years of rich history from the dreadful World War II. It witnessed the fall of Singapore and the brutal torture of Prisoners of War.

A quick net search shows me that they have a footage style horror set there, whilst I could not find anything solid on hauntings it seems that there are people making stories for the place anyway.

The general synopsis of this one is that a blimp patrolling the California Coast during WWII crashed but there were no crew members aboard. In 1942 the Second World War had not been given a final outcome, the Japanese might still be due to launch an attack on the West Coast of America. The US Navy put together a fleet of 12 blimps that  patrolled the California coastline and the mission of this squadron proved pretty much uneventful until August 1942.

A blimp crashed in the street of Daley City in California, the two man crew was not on board. Later that day the legend was born. It was felt that it would be damned near  impossible for them to have gone unnoticed as they would have had to have jumped out or at least ran from scene.

San Francisco – August 16th 1942, Flight 101 was preparing to take off with Lt Ernest DeWitt (27 yrs old) and Ensign Charles Ellis Adams (34 yrs old). Both were an experienced and reliable pilot which adds the fuel to the mystery. Riley Hill was supposed to go with them that morning, but just before they set off for some reason he was ordered off. He thinks that the heavy moisture in the air would have meant it was unsafe to have three men on board.  The flight plan too them from Treasure Island, San Francisco Bay, passed the Golden Gate Bridge over the Farallon Islands and then to Point Reyes and south along the coastline. It went smoothly until an hour and a half in, where Lt Cody told them four miles east of the Farallones they reported an oil slick on the water. They were the last words received and with no further communications it was assumed it was going okay.

After three hours of trying to contact the blimp it was definitely a concern, there was no answer and finally a message came from someone else 8 miles off course just south of  San Francisco. A swimmer called through, Mr Capulvea, to say that he was bout to go into the water when the giant blimp came right for him!

It dragged along the sand for a while, then eventually hit heavily on the side of the canyon. It was seen by hundreds of people, the blimp lost its altitude and came crashing down towards the city. It was impressive that no one was injured and when the authorities arrived the door was latched open, unusual for an in-flight position. The safety bar that blocked the door was not in place and a microphone used for the outside loudspeaker was found dangling from the gondola. The radio switch was still on and working, the fuel valves had not been tampered with and still had 6 hours of fuel. The Lt’s cap was resting on the instrument panel, two of the three life jackets were missing suggesting they were wearing them as per regulations, all crew had to wear them whilst in flight.

There was also a locked briefcase on boar with top-secret codes that were still there. It looked like they had opened the door and disappeared into thin air. Planes that passed between 7am and 11am that morning had even passed close enough to see the passengers inside. So just what did happen?

The Naval investigators theory was that they had tried to repair it; one was on the outside and got into trouble. The other came to assist and both were swept overboard. A year later both Cody and Adams were officially declared dead. And the blimp? It was repaired and after the war became the Goodyear Blimp, seen by millions at the sporting events across the country. How many of those people would likely have known that it was the infamous Ghost Blimp?

An in-depth look at this is here….