Posts Tagged ‘england’

It’s no secret that England is considered an old historical place and has a fair share of ghost stories, from headless horsemen to the ghosts of animals on the moors and Sussex, England may be subject to a road with an interesting haunting but also a potentially dangerous one. (Starting source BBC Website)

In November 1992, a unsuspecting Ian Sharpe was driving along the road from Sussex to Kent. A girl in white, with what he described as “beautiful eyes”, stepped in front of his car without warning and she disappeared under the front wheels. Shocked and distraught he stopped the car, he was sure he had killed her or at the very least caused her some serious injury. He got out and made a search to find no body, human or animal and not even a sign of impact, other than the frantic beating of his heart.

Two weeks later another report of a man experiencing a similar event came in, again he rushed out expecting a tragedy to find zero evidence of the event.

There is another nearby road where another unexplained happening has been reported, this time a little less worrying as people are not slamming on their brakes but there is a phantom hitch-hiker near the Lower Bell public house on the same road, the mysterious entity spends a ride towards Maidstone putting the worlds to right with their drive before vanishing right out of the seat.

So what is the speculation behind this? Some believe that it is of a woman called Judith Langham who was knocked down in 1965, she was wearing her white bridal gown on the way to her wedding, Has the poor victim now become a white lady?

There is another report earlier than that of 1992 with Ian Sharpe too, in 1974 a man named Maurice Goodenaugh came to the local police to say that he had left a blanket on a woman he had hit and had begged for help. When he came back with the police there was no sign of the seriously hurt woman and again nothing to suggest what had happened to her if she had been there in the first place.

After this there are two other people that stepped forward to report it, this was listed in the tabloid “The Sun” and Joseph Chester and Tracy Boon said they had seen a woman wearing a nightgown on the road, in 1968 and in 1999. They also report a man called Bob Vandeeper gave a woman a lift in 1962 but this is before the crash and so could not be the bride surely?

So is this all correct? Well it seems not, there is more information about this, Judith Langham was not the bride but there was a bride that died. 19th November 1965, a Friday and the eve of her wedding, at Blue Bell Hill. A Jaguar, driven by Harry Backhouse, collided with a Ford Cortina and killed three of the four woman, one of which was 22-year-old Susan Browne, who was due to marry RAF technician Brian Wettton, she died five days after the accident in the hospital. There were two other women, Judith Lingham and Patricia Ferguson, and Patricia died at the site, but Judith died later on, which is probably where the initial rumour about the bride began.

So is this road haunted or is it just that there’s a tragedy there and unusual events have transposed themselves around to fit it? Or is there really the ghost of a young woman killed at the scene, bride or not? And if so who was the other mystery person in 1962?

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Yes, those things you got taught to draw as a kid, if you were like me you also enjoyed turning the corner of your schoolbooks into epic motion pictures of stick man adventures too.

There are reports of these creatures/men being seen as real entity’s, some more obscure reports mention them wearing a stick hat. The walk they adopt is a sort of lo-lope gait and are surprised when seen but have followed some of their more unfortunate witnesses.

There have so far been no reports of harm coming to someone and they tend to just disappear. There seems to be no tales for their origins and but a theory is they may have come from a 2D universe. I dounf one account, via Mike Dash’s book Borderlands, which stated two people were travelling across the All Road, Elveden in England and caught a glimpse of them in the headlights.

Stories about sightings have turned up since 2008. it might be another urban legend or creation like Slenderman, or an attempt to get something viral for a marketing campaign that never reached fruition. It seems that simple google searches bring up forums that show people willing to share experiences but I couldn’t see any good video’s or footage. I was reminded of a previous subject however, about the strange alien stick figures/nightcrawlers.

Bram Stoker is famous for his novel Dracula, the named linked in modern times to Vlad Tepes, the son of the dragon and quite a few associations between the seaside town of Whitby, England are reflected in his book.

Fanny Harker was for many years the landlady to Stoker and used the family name in honour of that friendship. Stoker was married with one child, Noel, whilst on holiday with his family a local tragedy seemed to have inspired a well-known part of his book (if not a great deal). Chapter 7 is where the Russian ship the Demeter rolls in, unmanned bar a dead man’s hand which seems to have originated from an incident when local small fishing vessels (known as Cobles) were doing their usual business.

One was off the towns harbour when from the mists a large ship came out in front. Frantic cries from the fishermen went unheard and the ship carried on towards the coble. It upturned the small vessel as it hurt and drown two of the crew in the process, it then carried on sailing and disappeared into the mist.

The “great storm” mentioned did occur, many bad storms had hit the coast over the years but it is generally accepted that Stoker meant the one from 1861.

Much of the descriptions he gives for Whitby are still pretty accurate for today, visitors can follow historical trails for both Bram Stoker and Dracula inspired looks at the town. Whitby has many local landmarks and good views, including ones over the harbour where you can still see fishing vessels and crew at sea.

 

Ollerton, Nottinghamshire here in England has the ruins of a Cistercian Abbey, Rufford Abbey, and it is currently maintained by the English Heritage, the 1170ish abbey is one of the best preserved in England. In 1146 the Earl of Lincoln founded the abbey, St Mary the Virgin, and the monks wore undyed wool habits giving the nickname of “White Monks”. The monks there lived under the values of hard work and prayer from the completion around 1170 until it was suppressed in 1536.

From there on it became a family estate, remodelled and adapted to their needs accordingly and in 1952 it and its park were brought by Nottinghamshire Country Council, the north and east wings were then demolished in 1956. In the Edwardian times Vita Sackville West (authoress) stayed at the abbey as the guest to the owners of the time, the Saville’s awoke in the night feeling a clammy sensation. She mentioned the event to another of the guests and found out that others had been bothered by what they called a ‘Clammy Baby’, the ghost of a dead child trying to snuggle against women. These areas were demolished but now and then the stories crop up again.

One of the guides told a story about the sounds of a child having been heard in a ditch near an area known as Bride Road, she was surprised to hear from a couple of ladies who regularly walked their dogs and had heard the cries themselves. A psychic who visited also found herself drawn to that area, but had not been informed of a local story that a housemaid at the abbey drowned herself, and the baby, after an unwanted pregnancy.

I ventured out there as it was a nice day, packed the camera up and it took about 40 minutes drive to get there. I was immediately in love with the building, it has a grand look and to get to the building you walk up via the 19th Century stairs that had been added. I also loved that I got a few quiet moments to look around before a school trip descended. Underneath the exterior you can go into the underground chapel area and enjoy cooling down.

I didn’t really feel anything too spooky but there is a section with a model monk and table showing the foods of the time, I stood near him and felt a little spooked out. I suspect more to do with the model monk than anything else. I did venture towards the ditch but my attention was drawn to the animal graces, consequently the only ones there as the human remains were moved to the local church.

(Photography is my own)

The village of Hayfield was found first in the Doomsday Book under the name Hedfeld and was a natural clearing in the forest at the foot of the highest point in the Peak District, and the southern-most point of the Pennine Chain. It was a mill village from the 17th Century onward and the village is a popular place for walkers, and visitors to the Peak District. There are a couple of interesting little legends about the area which is why I have picked them for the blog.

There are two churches in the area, St Matthew and St John’s Methodist Church (the third was de-consecrated and currently in use as a library) and St Matthew has existed there since 1386. It was previously at Kirksteads and was not completed until 1405, it was then largely rebuilt in 1817/18 and the remnants of the building are visible in the church crypt. The St John’s Methodist Church dates from around 1782 and claims to be the 13th to have been built, and although the building has been added too, the four main walls are entirely original.

31st August 1745 Dr James Clegg, the minister of a Presbyterian Church at nearby Chapel-en-le-Frith, wrote to the Glossopdale Chronicle (local newspaper) reporting that “hundreds of bodies rose out of the grave in the open air” from the graveyard of St Matthews Church. They then proceeded to disappear leaving Dr Clegg to remark something that sounds rather Lovecraftian or Poe in nature “… what is become of them or in what distant region of this vast system they have since fixed their residence no mortal can tell.”

The village also had its very own witch; in 1760 Susannah Huggin sold wooden weaving pins and bewitching charms. An old sailor brought one of the charms and then shortly afterwards he disappeared, she was then discovered to be back in possession of the charm. The villagers blamed her for his disappearance; she was dragged in front of the George Pub and pelted with rotten fruit and stones, to the point at which she was almost killed. Later on somebody from the Tom Hey’s Farm then took the little charm but after a series of disasters, including milk not churning and animals refusing to eat, the charm was then exorcised by a reluctant Reverend Baddeley.

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By Clem Rutter, Rochester, Kent. – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7349638