Archive for the ‘Theology’ Category

Japanese immigrants brought the legend with them to Hawaii, the legend is of the faceless creature. In Japan a famous Mujina was Kozo, he took the form of a monk and would travel the roads at night, he would ask passers by for tea or water.

In 1959 at a drive-through in Kahala, Hawaii, a woman was reported to have come into contact with one of these creatures. The local woman went to the restroom and noticed a red-headed lady brushing her hair. She got close enough to see the woman had no facial features, she had to be treated at the hospital for a nervous breakdown over the event.

A local radio show host, Glen Grant, picked up the story and gave it to his listeners in 1981. The woman involved called up to recount the tale and told him the previously unreported detail about the red hair, since then it seems other witnesses have come forward about the Mujina.

A story about the Mujina here.

Ryoan_Mujina

 

According to Japanese Copyright Law the copyright on this work has expired and is as such public domain. According to articles 51 and 57 of the copyright laws of Japan, under the jurisdiction of the Government of Japan all non-photographic works enter the public domain 50 years after the death of the creator (there being multiple creators, the creator who dies last) or 50 years after publication for anonymous or pseudonymous authors or for works whose copyright holder is an organization.

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An Erdstall seems to be a mystery even to historians, they are a type of tunnel found in various locations around Europe. They are usually low and narrow tunnels with a feature that goes from a tunnel into a lower tunnel called a ‘schlupf’ and is too narrow for the elderly or large to navigate.

They only have one concealed entry point, there is no second exit and they are not often larger than 50 foot in length.

They have no materials to give any archaeological clues as to their use. the nature of the constructions do not suggest them being used a dwellings. Coal fire pits and a few other hints give a date range from 10-12th Century.

There are a fair few but they are not listed in Christian Kingdoms of the time. It is possible however it is due to them being used for Spiritual purposes of a non-Christian cult of belief. They have have been used to crawl through, in order to ritually remove the person from disease or from feelings of guilt.

1280px-Erdstall_Ratgöbluckn_Perg_Eingang

 

Erdstall Ratgöbluckn Perg Eingang” by Pfeifferfranz (talk) – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 at via Wikimedia Commons.

A Dakhma in Persian, a Cheel Ghar in Hindi and in English it is known as Tower of Silence. They are circular raised structures that are used to expose the dead, for the scavenging birds it makes the dead easy pickings. It sounds strange to many but in Zoroastrian tradition a dead body is considered to be unclean.

The corpse demon, Avestan, are thought to rush in to the body and contaminate everything it comes into contact with. There are therefore strict rules for the disposal of the dead to ensure the safety of the living.

In Greater Iran the structures were used until 1970’s when they were shut down by law. Located at Diu, India one of them as been listed as a ‘monument of national importance’. It is one of the 17 in Daman and Diu, the Parsi cemetery may well be one of those persevered for a tradition that is dying out.

BombayTempleOfSilenceEngraving

 

BombayTempleOfSilenceEngraving” by Cornelius Brown – Engraving from 1886 book “True Stories of the Reign of Queen Victoria” by Cornelius Brown. Scanned from original copy by Infrogmation (talk).. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

An 18 acre site of land in Waterbury, Connecticut, USA that had a theme park based around passages from the bible. In 1984 the theme park closed down and there is now a project, ongoing, to restore it. It was a concept of John Baptist Greco, of Waterbury, who wanted an attraction that would replicate the Bethlehem and Jerusalem of the biblical era. It was to be a place of peace for any colour, race or creed. During its peak in the 1960’s to 70’s it had upwards of 40,000 visitors on an annual basis, it was sadly left unfinished when Greco died in 1986. It has since fell into a state of disrepair.

It is featured on the website Roadside America along with warnings about exploring it, especially if you are not up to date with your tetanus shots.

July 201 saw another dark spot in the area’s history when the rape and murder of a 16 year old female brought a renewed media interest to it. In 2013 the land was brought with a plan to be renovated, and 22nd December 2013 the new cross was lit up on the site.

 

HolyLand

 

HolyLand“. Via Wikipedia.

It is a site 12km north of the city of Šiauliai in Lithuania, it is a site of pilgrimage and the exact time at which the practise of leaving crosses began is unknown. The practise most likely came from around the two uprisings of the Polish and Lithuanian people against the Russian authorities. The Russian Empire took control in 1795, two uprisings from 1831 and 1863 left many perished rebels with their bodies unclaimed and never returned to their family. The crosses are symbols of the fallen and represent the endurance of the Lithuanian Catholocism.

During 1944 – 1990 people continued to travel up the hill, displaying an allegiance to their original identity. It was a venue of resistance and the occupied Soviet Union tried to remove crosses and even bulldozed it three times.

7th September 1993, Pope John Paul II visited, he declared it a place for hope, peace, love and sacrifice. As the hill remains under nobody’s jurisdiction people remain free to build crosses as they see fit.

Kryžių_kalnas_(Góra_Krzyży)

 

Kryžių kalnas (Góra Krzyży)” by Pudelek (Marcin Szala) – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.