Archive for September, 2014

Dalkeith, Lothian, Scotland has been given mention in vampiric tales thanks to a murder trial that left James Spalding going to the gallows in 1638, convicted of murder. The story goes that he prayed he would not die until he had found a way to reconcile with God. He did not die at the scaffolding and instead was buried alive.

The results was ‘a rumbling and tumbling in his grave that the very earth was raised’. It is also said that his former house is still haunted after he rose from the grave and crawled back to town.

Additional bits? Well it seems that the source of the story is not vampiric, although mentioned on the History Channels Vampire Secrets series… the source comes from ‘Satan’s Invisible World’ published in 1685 by a gent named George Sinclair and whilst it mentions him coming back as a ghost it does not mention anything about a physical body rising from the grave.

Whilst the story may have adapted or been changed the basis of this one seems more with the other plane than it does with earthly risings.

Another blog on the matter.

Vampire_Secrets

Vampire Secrets” by Derived from a digital capture (photo/scan) of the VHS or DVD Cover (creator of this digital version is irrelevant as the copyright in all equivalent images is still held by the same party). Copyright held by the film company or the artist. Claimed as fair use regardless.. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia.

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Semarang, Central Jave, Indonesia has a colonial era building as a famous landmark. The local city government has attempted to re-brand it, as it’s more well-known locally as a haunted house.

The name translates to ‘Thousand Doors’ and this name comes from its large design, the numerous arts and doors, not to mention around 600 large windows.

It’s construction started in 1904, and was finished in 1907; by 2009 it had fallen into a state of disrepair. Inside its walls were cracked and the wallpaper was left hanging off, mould and weeds were taking over and only the exterior has been kept up to any measure.

In 2014 the Semarang City Government stated they planned to use the building for a food court, and maybe a gym in an attempt to stop the rumours, and yet still attracts around 1,000 people a day.

One of the ghosts is said to be a Dutchwoman who committed suicide inside the building. There is also said to be headless ghouls that wander it’s corridors too.

In 2007 the building was used for a horror film ‘Lewang Sewu: Dendam Kuntilanak’ based on the legends. The plot sees high school students trapped inside after several of them need to urinate, in the film there is a Dutchwoman, and a man with a ball and chain around his leg. If that isn’t enough to sate your budget horror palate there’s a Kuntilanak (vampire ghost). The film got a poor reception and scathing reviews, you’ve been warned. It could be horrific but an entirely different set of reasons!

Basement_of_Lawang_Sewu_2011

 

Basement of Lawang Sewu 2011” by Crisco 1492Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

A Dakhma in Persian, a Cheel Ghar in Hindi and in English it is known as Tower of Silence. They are circular raised structures that are used to expose the dead, for the scavenging birds it makes the dead easy pickings. It sounds strange to many but in Zoroastrian tradition a dead body is considered to be unclean.

The corpse demon, Avestan, are thought to rush in to the body and contaminate everything it comes into contact with. There are therefore strict rules for the disposal of the dead to ensure the safety of the living.

In Greater Iran the structures were used until 1970’s when they were shut down by law. Located at Diu, India one of them as been listed as a ‘monument of national importance’. It is one of the 17 in Daman and Diu, the Parsi cemetery may well be one of those persevered for a tradition that is dying out.

BombayTempleOfSilenceEngraving

 

BombayTempleOfSilenceEngraving” by Cornelius Brown – Engraving from 1886 book “True Stories of the Reign of Queen Victoria” by Cornelius Brown. Scanned from original copy by Infrogmation (talk).. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The Hypogeum of Paolo, Malta is a subterranean structure from 3000-2500 BC. It may originally have been a sanctuary but became a necropolis and the remains of some 7,000 and more individuals have been found.

In 1980 the World Heritage List was updated to contain the Hypogeum, after restoration in the 1990’s the site has since re-opened and allows for entry for 60 people a day.

The structure was discovered in 1902 by accident when building workers broke through into the roof of the complex.

If you want to go and see this piece of history when you are in the area it is suggested that you book your tickets well in advance.

Photo_Ellis_Hal_Salflieni
Photo Ellis Hal Salflieni” by Richard Ellis décédé en 1924 – domaine public. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

One of the most famous areas of the air base in Okinawa, Japan, is building 2283. The building is a single-unit family home that is sat in the residential area for mid-grade officers and a day care centre sits next to it. It stopped being used for it’s main function some time ago, now it is uninhabited and serves as a storage facility.

Tour guides in the area tell about the murder of former residents, about the water facets or lights turning on and off of their own accord. Another story tells of a Samurai apparition that rides through the house, and another of a woman who has been seen washing her hair in the utility sink.

Despite little to no evidence of the deaths at the building the horror stories continue. One of them also includes the story about a teenage girl that was stabbed to death by her step-father, and as an island with a vast history for those in the area it’s not surprise they continue to surface.

A tomb across the street from the house is said to be that of an old Okinawa Samurai, perhaps that area was part of the same estate in days gone by and that might be an explanation as to where the story has risen from.